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vnewman
vnewman
1/26/2016 2:00:37 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
@mpouraryan - Well, no decision is still a decision, it's just the decision not to take action.  :)  What I like to say is, "When in doubt, do nothing!"

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vnewman
vnewman
1/26/2016 1:45:37 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
True, and correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't METV merely like a aggregate or search engine for content that was already out there?

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Mitch Wagner
Mitch Wagner
1/26/2016 11:15:32 AM
User Rank
Gold
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
mhhf1ve - Creating compelling content requires skill and money in areas that service providers often lack expertise. 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
1/25/2016 6:55:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
I like the term "analysis paralysis"--at some stage a decision has to be made for sure.   We have to make a decision at some stage--Just to share with all, I have been running both Roku & Amazon--and I am experiencing bandwidth issues which I need to fix by probably upgrading my service.    I also think do also underscore that choice can be both "good" and "bad"--I tend to edge on the side of the positive because it is through that very fact that we can finally cross the "Chasm" and have the mass market appeal.   I hope all agree we see that already with the iOT. 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
1/25/2016 6:45:28 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
As someone who is part of the "cord cutting" crowd, I am quite happy w/my Amazon FireTV.    Ariella underscored how "too many choices" may end up truly confusing folks.   However, what is clear is that in the Transformation we're witnessing, it is frankly fun--but the question is one of bandwith before one even worries about Sports and as Joe put it, the "excitement" that it entails. 

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
1/25/2016 3:25:05 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
@Ariella, @vnewman:

Good analogy both of you.

'Analysis Paralysis' is the excat phrase which can considerably impact the end result. In my personal experience when i am given with too many choices, I often get into the same mode and end up settling with the best out of confusion. More options are good to the extent that we don't end up in that paralysis mode. Having choices is certainly better, but not too many to be overwhelmed with.

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Ariella
Ariella
1/25/2016 2:40:58 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
@vnewman exactly! It comes down to all kinds of things. When you have just a handful of choices, it can be easier to make a decision than when you have 50. That's why when I took my daughter to a photographer for her yearbook picture, she only showed her the pictures three at a time rather than the whole bunch. She kept going down in bunches of three, always keeping on the choice of the previous batch with the next two until it was finally narrowed down to one choice. 

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vnewman
vnewman
1/25/2016 2:24:13 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
@Ariella.  That's a great study and you make a great point.  "Paralysis by Analysis" is the term I like to use.  This is also the theory Costco subscribes to and it is discussed in depth on CNBC's The Costco Craze: Inside the Warehousing Giant.  They use ketchup as an example: They only carry a couple of brands to choose from otherwise they found people get overwhelmed with choices and end up buying nothing at all.

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Ariella
Ariella
1/25/2016 9:26:03 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
@Joe it's true. Studies have proven that there is such a thing as having too many choices.  I recall they wer with jam and found confirmation in the NY Times ran six years ago under the title Too Many Choices: A Problem That Can Paralyze:

There is a famous jam study (famous, at least, among those who research choice), that is often used to bolster this point. Sheena Iyengar, a professor of business at Columbia University and the author of "The Art of Choosing," (Twelve) to be published next month, conducted the study in 1995.

In a California gourmet market, Professor Iyengar and her research assistants set up a booth of samples of Wilkin & Sons jams. Every few hours, they switched from offering a selection of 24 jams to a group of six jams. On average, customers tasted two jams, regardless of the size of the assortment, and each one received a coupon good for $1 off one Wilkin & Sons jam.

Here's the interesting part. Sixty percent of customers were drawn to the large assortment, while only 40 percent stopped by the small one. But 30 percent of the people who had sampled from the small assortment decided to buy jam, while only 3 percent of those confronted with the two dozen jams purchased a jar.

That study "raised the hypothesis that the presence of choice might be appealing as a theory," Professor Iyengar said last year, "but in reality, people might find more and more choice to actually be debilitating."

Over the years, versions of the jam study have been conducted using all sorts of subjects, like chocolate and speed dating.

I suppose then that someone can do the same for channels.

 

 



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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
1/25/2016 9:13:40 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Contrasting experiences in US and Europe
@Ariella: I think there comes the point where reduced options from more basic cable packages begin to make sense -- if only to infuse some simplicity to one's life!

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