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DHagar
DHagar
2/29/2016 10:21:47 PM
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Platinum
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@Joe, thanks for info. - that makes sense and I can see where they would have the force of law.

Maybe a network of companiesfrom industry can advance some "more workable" standards that can influence, if not supersede, the regulatory standards. 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/29/2016 10:12:58 PM
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Author
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@DHagar: Thank you so much for the compliment!  I really appreciate it!

As for NIST, they do perpetuate important indsutry standards (such as various cryptography standards -- albeit one of those was, notoriously, infiltrated by the NSA), help keep professionals aware of known vulnerabilities, and support Executive Orders on technology -- such as through the NIST Cybersecurity Framework (which, while not technically "law", has the pseudoforce of law as other agencies -- actually responsible for regulatory enforcement -- increasingly rely on the Framework).

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DHagar
DHagar
2/29/2016 2:41:38 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@Joe, thanks for clarification.  No, I believe we are on the same page in this way.  I believe that increased government regulations and standards will fully restrict the cloud and regulate as a utility.  I do believe I misunderstood in reading the article, I thought NIST was more of a professional association that the government was deferring to for setting up national standards.  What you say makes sense.

I can see NIST, being a federal agency, is just building the road (standards) that will increase regulation, not create standards that will allow the industry to advance - similar to the evolution of the internet.

(Note:  Still great article!)

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/27/2016 11:11:14 PM
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Author
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@DHagar: I feel like either I'm misunderstanding you or you're misunderstanding me.  NIST is a federal agency.  Operating cloud providers like utilities would reduce competition (after all, the whole reason why utilities are so heavily regulated -- on the state level in particular, mind you -- is because they are, in exchange for the heavy regulation, granted legal monopolies or oligopolies on vital services.

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DHagar
DHagar
2/26/2016 1:29:52 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@Joe, thanks - great article, by the way!

It seems as if the government wants to use the model but that, as NIST points out, the way the industry operates is different.  I would imagine that the freedom to compete is what NIST may be jealously guarding.  It appears that the government is letting them self-regulate at this point.  It will be an interesting dynamic to watch.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/26/2016 3:14:50 AM
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Author
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@DHagar: Indeed, the federal government has been pushing for some time for the cloud to be treated (i.e., regulated) as a utility.  (Link)

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DHagar
DHagar
2/23/2016 4:18:49 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
Joe, great analogy.  And I agree that for many, storage is no more than a "utility".That will remain the fundamental model.  But I think those who add the "value" services (ie billing and other value services), may standout and be able to truly create a higher value service and even reap the financial benefits - instead of just waiting for the ship to rise.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
2/23/2016 2:55:09 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@dhagar: And, truth be told, most of these companies are not in the storage business -- and yet they have to invest so much in storage.

The cloud is to data sort of as the mutual fund is to investment.

The theory is that pooled resources will let all ships rise.

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DHagar
DHagar
2/12/2016 6:29:54 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
freehe, I fully agree and the Gartner Quadrant is a great model.

These are super examples of providers who failed to change.  Just trying to squeeze value out of the old models does not work.  You really have to reinvent, not even realign, your services and partnerships in new models that fit your customers, your capabilities, your market opportunities, etc.  It truly is an ongoing reinvention - so you are either protecting your current turf or creating your future.  I would rather be on the front end creating the future.

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freehe
freehe
2/12/2016 4:24:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Seems like not such a difficult problem to solve....
@DHagar, I agree with your comments. The companies are working in silos. The major companies need to collaborate and worked together to create a single solution, technology or platform. For Telco companies to survive they have to constantly innovate and keep up with their competitors. Telco companies should try to follow the Gartner Magic Quadrant to remain competitive and meet the ever changing needs of customers.

http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/methodologies/research_mq.jsp

This is where many companies fall behind and then try to catch up - only to eventually go out of business. Telcom comapnies that fail to adapt will eventually file bankruptcy.

Here's 2 great articles on failure of Telco companies.

http://www.ey.com/GL/en/Industries/Telecommunications/Top-10-risks-in-telecommunications-2012---Failure-to-shift-the-business-model-from-minutes-to-bytes

http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY_-_Top_10_risks_in_telecommunications_2014/$FILE/EY-top-10-risks-in-telecommunications-2014.pdf (full report)

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