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faryl
faryl
4/27/2016 4:17:03 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The concern with security
Sneakers is another classic! If I remember correctly, Steve Wozniack & Steve Jobs both used to do phone "phreaking" (with a box that imitated dial tones to trick pay phones) back in the early years. So - aside from cheesy movies - maybe a couple of good things developed from security holes!

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dlr5288
dlr5288
4/25/2016 8:18:25 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The concern with security
It's crazy how things change!

Now with security everyone has to be so careful when they're putting their things out online or on a device. Even when I'm shopping online I'm so leary about putting my card information out there. It's crazy how easy it is to gain access into people's computers, tablets, etc.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
4/25/2016 8:10:23 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The concern with security
Very true, and good point!

Hackers will never stop attempting to get in. I think, at least for me, that's what's so scary. At any moment someone can get into a phone, computer, etc. It's something that should always be on the top of people's minds.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/24/2016 2:03:04 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The concern with security
@joe, LOL. I just made up fatal toe syndrome, but when you said you googled it, naturally I did too, and discovered there's something called blue toe syndrome that is sometimes associated with fatality. (It's bad circulation associated with strokes and heart attacks, so nobody else has to go look).

Slightly more seriously, a good webscraping program that I could write in R (and I'm really just learning R, not at all proficient yet) could probably gin up "the 10,000 most likely passwords for" any given person, with a probably better than 95% chance that their password was on the list.

I'm wondering if someday there will be a market for an input/output system so that when you go online, your computer automatically consistently changes personal data on every unsecured link (e.g. always alters your birthday to something else that's plus or minus two years from your real one, changes your high school graduation date to match, moves your high school one district over, makes your mother's maiden name different (while still leaving it a last name) etc. etc. etc., and then re-alters as things come back in.  As one co-worker said to me once, "Everyone wants to be private and everyone wants to talk about their stuff."

 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
4/24/2016 8:56:05 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: The concern with security
@John: Even then, we were being warned to not use "password," "123456," and our first names -- and even now, we still do!  Marvelous.

I had to Google "Fatal Toe Syndrome" while reading your comment, incidentally.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/21/2016 7:35:04 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The concern with security
@Joe, that's a multigeneration trend now. When I started as an undergrad, most colleges were using social security number as a student i.d. because "no one would know it except the student" and it had no other uses outside the social security system.  My first ATM card came with a list of suggested ways to come up with a password, and its only cautions were not to use "password", your name, or 12345...; it actually suggested using your birthdate or high school+graduation year.

Things, as they say, have changed; nowadays you can Google "most common street name in .... ", "most common pet names" by decade, and huge amounts of personal data. Biometric information is being used to prevent patient misidentification (so we're less like to chop off Sydney's toe instead of Syndey's, when Sydney comes in for her athlete's foot and Syndey is delayed coming back from the Fatal Toe Syndrome clinic).  Facebook and archives are rapidly destroying many of the common sources of "only you know."  And as the reserve of private data that has never been on line grows ever smaller for almost everyone, the value of stealing the last bits just goes up.

 

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
4/20/2016 7:06:07 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: The concern with security
@faryl: To solve that problem, there's a cassette-player adapter you can use to play mp3s and whatnot.  Check it out.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
4/20/2016 7:04:47 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: The concern with security
@faryl: I never saw Hackers, but a friend told me about it -- and, along with it, the tip about clicking the receiver on a landline (non-cordless) phone to correspond with numbers being dialed, simulating a rotary phone.

I did see Sneakers, though.  But that was a long time ago.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
4/20/2016 6:52:36 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Security
@vnewman: Thanks, but I can't take credit for coming up with it.  It's become a fairly common term in the industry over the past few years.

As for being on the front page of the NYT, I usually hear that with the WSJ, but the point is the same.

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batye
batye
4/1/2016 5:50:51 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The concern with security
@freehe  with security is never 100 % totaly secure... always weak link - human factor...

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