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Ariella
Ariella
6/23/2016 8:42:39 AM
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Re: Of course, another way this can be looked at...
<We don't even have to accept journalists who want us to accept it.> @JohnBarnes Ha! Journalists today are always pushing some agenda or other. If your throw all of that ilk at, we'd be left with maybe a tiny handful who believe in sticking to facts.

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Adi
Adi
6/23/2016 12:47:02 AM
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Purely healthcare?
Sounds like Samsung is only looking at healthcare as an application for IoT. Are they not exploring other applications? I would imagine similar functionality would be useful across other sectors as well.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
6/22/2016 10:20:12 PM
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Re: Not Suprising
Mike, I'm not sure they're focusing on the "human" side as much as they are on the "getting rid of expensive, unreliable humans" side.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
6/22/2016 10:18:01 PM
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Re: Of course, another way this can be looked at...
Ariella, that quote is a perfect example of what's so silly in so much of tech journalism today. Collectively we don't have to accept a lonelier, colder, more isolated world just so the engineers can make more nifty toys. We don't even have to accept journalists who want us to accept it.

 

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Ariella
Ariella
6/22/2016 12:46:21 PM
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Re: Of course, another way this can be looked at...
@JohnBarnes though it sounds less than appealing, that does seem to be the direction that we're going in, particularly for older people who live alone. In fact, Good ran an article entitled, Why Robots Are the Future of Elder Care In Japan it is perfectly acceptable to offer a senior person a robot companion, and while some look like people, some come in the shape of baby seals as illustrated here:



The article says:

in2013 and 2014 especially, the Japanese governmentpoured millions into incentivizing eldercare robotics development. Many have looked at Japan's kawaii and cuddly droids and rolled their eyes, questioning whether or not such technologies could ever really gain traction with the rest of the world. But over the past couple of years, elder care robot research and development has grown more conventional and cheaper, producing products with greater functionality and broader consumer acceptance. And it's started to take hold in companies beyond Japan too, suggesting a growing wave of acceptance and support for the concept. So no matter how uncomfortable we may be with robots, it seems like it's high time for all of us to accept, if not enthusiastically embrace, the dawning of the Asimov era.

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clrmoney
clrmoney
6/22/2016 11:44:09 AM
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Samsung Brand
Samsung along with many others have competitors so in order for them to stay in the game they need to step in up and come up with better products and technology or something or they will be wiped out.

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Mike Robuck
Mike Robuck
6/22/2016 10:34:18 AM
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Re: Not Suprising
I agree, not a company known for working with others and being an innovation leader. It will be interesting to see how this plays out with them focusing on the "human" aspect of IoT instead of other areas. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
6/22/2016 7:50:59 AM
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Of course, another way this can be looked at...
.... is saving money for families and society by having machines, rather than people, take care of old people.  Human contact is quaint, and worse than that, expensive. If the couch makes sure you're still moving around and the fridge feeds you, you don't have to talk to anyone or hear about their lives (presumably the couch and fridge won't be very chatty), and need never be bothered with people at all. Lucky old people!  Just what they need -- less human contact!

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
6/22/2016 7:46:32 AM
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Re: Not Suprising
afwriter, and in light of Samsung's history and culture, isn't it kind of revealing that they see IoT as a way to assist the eldery and disabled? About the most conservative and non-innovative use this new field has?

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afwriter
afwriter
6/22/2016 12:47:18 AM
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Platinum
Not Suprising
Samsung has made a fortune coatailing the newest tech.  It is not surprising that they are dropping more money into the newest trends.  I'm not going to say that they are not good at what they do, but they are definitely not trend setters. 

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