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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
8/21/2016 10:59:05 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Internet living up to its potential
OMG, I feel so frustrated and helpless at times.

I ask a question and my son doesn't even get the question because his focus is not there. Any time I never get a response back any sooner than 5/10 mins and often times i have to repeat the question. That keeps bothering me a lot.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
8/1/2016 6:54:16 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
Mpouraryan, Well, and here we all are! Actually from my time as a math tutor in my wife's tutoring business, and from working on a never-completed book on math coaching, I'm a big fan of Common Core for math.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/31/2016 11:33:12 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
You may not believe this @JohnBarnes, but you just made one of the most credible arguments for the need and necessity for Common Core that forces students to think.  We have to underscore that always as we are witness to transformation that at times is overwhelming.

"See" You all next month :) 

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/31/2016 11:28:20 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mpouraryan,

I never did get around to answering this, till now anyway ... the effective use I have in mind is synthesis of new ideas, and improvement of existing ones, or in short the creation of new knowledge. The Web/net/Google etc. can support this but there has to be a mind capable of operating on ideas (rather than just transcribing them) and doing it well, and Google encourages and abets the opposite by acting sort of like a cheat line in a trivia game. So if you ask a student to, for example, trace  the idea of freedom through Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, the student nowadays will paraphrase (if you're lucky -- more often just cut and paste) the first thing s/he Googles up about Hobbes+freedom, then the first thing about Locke+freedom, then Rousseau+freedom, full stop. The student will not absorb the three different related concepts or any structure of relationship, as the assignment intends, because that doesn't result in a simple, recognizable piece of "content" to the student.

And a contemporary student who doesn't know the difference between three unrelated juxtaposed paraphrases and a single synthetic idea is, bluntly, dumber than a student of past generations who did. The hidden advantage of paper library research was that a student had to spend time reading the idea to get the gist (because it was too much to copy), copy that gist, paraphrase it not to avoid Turnitin but because that was part of the job of writing a coherent paper, and thus give him/herself multiple opportunities to understand it. Search engines and cut-and-paste have done away with all that.

 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/31/2016 9:57:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@JohnBarnes - as someone who taught college courses for a few years - I can tell you this is EXACTLY what is happening and it's frightening. No one takes the time to apply the ideas and information they find anywhere and use that to create a full thought. Critical thinking is rapidly becoming a thing of the past - no one believes anything new, just whatever information they were fed from whatever blog they were able to find. People's definition of a reliable source is becoming more and more liberal. Part of me is proud, while another part of me shudders when my three-year-old is able to offer a stronger argument for a belief than my students were. Great that I am teaching my three-year-old to think critically, insane that I teach 20-year-olds that aren't capable of the same level of thought. The sad thing is, Google could be an extremely exciting wealth of knowledge to have at our fingertips - and it really is. The bad thing is that it is misused and wasted by so many. Never has knowledge been so accessible to so many, and not utilized by so few. 

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dlr5288
dlr5288
7/31/2016 8:57:30 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Internet living up to its potential
Yes I know!

My younger sister is always on it and can't hold a conversation at times. It's beyond frustrating!

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/31/2016 6:25:45 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Internet living up to its potential
@dlr5288:

Absolutely scares me as well.

We all did the same. We didn't grow up with internet or tablet in hand. We had lot of outdoor free play time. That seemlessly helped us in coordination skills. Now if we look at kids, they are so much glued to their smart phones doing their own stuff. Mine takes 5/10 mis to respond if i ask something, if i am lucky. I am not at all happy about that.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
7/31/2016 6:15:59 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Internet living up to its potential
Younger kids having this much access to the internet is definitley a scary thing. At least in my eyes. When I was younger I would play outside or hang out with friends, not constantly looking at a phone or tablet.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/31/2016 1:56:51 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Internet living up to its potential
Rules well defined. I believe more or less most of us practice these rules today.

When we think about internet usage in office, majority of the companies have limitations to internet usage.

I often get very concerned  about mobile internet usage for teenage kids. We can only guard their internet usage to some extent but not all of it.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/31/2016 1:52:07 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
People lived their live just fine without this technology. 

Agree, We all did.

But the answer could be No if we think of our younger generation that currently breathe, eat and live internet and its social aspect. I personally see my teenanger going crazy if his phone is misplaced for just a couple of minutes. And that totally looks insane to me. But unfortunately i have not much control to this trend or behaviour and also i get dismissed for me not being well tuned into the trend.

Going back to the subject of this message, ofcourse even the youger generation are not born to be internet crazy. They just adapted the trend and got obsessive over time just because all the technology existed.

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