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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/31/2016 11:21:07 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Losing Digital Plot
@freehe - I think digital releases will likely become more and more popular, but at the same time, I truly hope theaters stay with us for a long time to come. They will potentially change with time, and eventually become less popular, but for me, there is magic in going to see a movie in the theatre. Though it's obvious it's becoming less popular, since most movies anymore include a short clip at the beginning with an actor thanking you for actually coming to the theater to watch the movie. 

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dlr5288
dlr5288
7/31/2016 9:04:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Losing Digital Plot
Very interesting points!

I agree I think we have to keep some human element in these things. Technology is changing and developing so fast that sometimes the people get lost in it. Being able to stll keep a human element in technology is very important.

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 10:54:23 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Losing Digital Plot
Transforming the movie industry and theme parks to virtual environments is great but we must remain concerned about removing the human element of connection with each other. Psychologists state that humans must have constant contact with either other to continue to grown and develop and human beings.

If companies continue to remove the human contact element we will all operate as zombies or robots and function as emotionless beings devoid of feelings such as empathy, compassion, kindness and generosity.

In addition, some people like having the experience of going out of the house to attend events of participate in activities. Some people get bored sitting at home.

The film industry capitalized on that. There are some areas where the film industry can advance. However if the film industry transforms to digitial releases versus film releases how will that impact the employees, the movie theater employees, vendors, tax revenue for cities. Several entities will be impacted and lose revenue by moving to a digital releases. I am not against digital releases but this is something to consider.

 

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/10/2016 2:30:34 AM
User Rank
Platinum
This has happened before ...
.... danger, danger, guy who wrote a dissertation in theatre history about to give quick lesson:

The NYC Broadway theater as we know it today originated in the late 1800s as a way for Charlie Frohman's Theatrical Syndicate, a near-monopoly on big theatres all over the US, to get all the theatre managers together every fall to pick out the shows that would go on the Road (the capitalized Road being the loop of the gigantic theaters that every sizable city had one of in those days), because the Road was where the real money was, but sending a first rate show out there was phenomenally expensive. So it made sense to try things out on Broadway first to see if they were ready for producers to "take them on the Road".  By the 1920s, the Road was dying, killed by movie theaters (it's a lot cheaper to send a film UPS than a railroad train with 30 actors, 80 stagehands and tech crew, and 10 boxcars of props and scenery).  But the New York audience for Broadway had been developed by the sheer volume and quality of what was available (almost 500 plays, musicals, and revues opening per year right after WW I), and now there was money in NYC.

But expenses were high and got higher, and the time for making the nut (so that a play at least didn't lose money) went from a few weeks in 1925 to more than a year by 1960. Ticket prices went from something that anyone could afford to middle-class  to affluent. Salaries and tech budgets exploded, artistic experimentation collapsed ("nothing as cowardly as a million dollars"), musicals lost their major role in introducing new pop songs, and gradually Broadway sank beneath all those forces into the museum it is today.

Hollywood has had a similar trajectory. In the 1930s a movie ticket cost about as much as a comic book or a loaf of bread, and millions of people had a three-double-features-a-week habit. In the 1950s the audience started to collapse but Hollywood was able to keep going as a content supplier for television and as a source for a technically superior product (a 40-foot-high Technicolor and/or Cinerama image on a screen beating the daylights out of your 9" circular Dumont black and white) and playing to a somewhat more upscale experience (people still dressed up a bit to go to the movies). Movies launched music, created stars, tried out themes that could then become tv shows, etc.

Well, like Broadway before it, Hollywood is hitting that point where it's really not necessary anymore. The husk will be there for a long time -- heck, opera and ballet, once popular forms with a mass audience, are not totally gone -- but the long run is pretty much over. Nothing lasts forever in the popular arts.

 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/8/2016 7:43:50 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: hollywood losing digital
@ mhh1ve - I was actually just having this conversation with my Mom. It seems like every movie anymore is a sequel or prequel or re-make. And right now it is very obvious they are targetting Gen Xers and millenials with nostaligia. Don't get me wrong, I was super excited about Independence Day, and have already seen it twice. It was "my" movie way back when! But what are they going to do in 20-30 years, with the 9-17 crowd today? Are they going to re-make another Independence Day? Wow everyone with the technology of the time and how much better they can make the movie? Are we being consumed in an endless and vicious cycle of repeating the same movies/themes for the rest of our lives?

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/7/2016 6:28:20 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: hollywood losing digital
> "the plots and effects seem so cookie cutter to me."

That's what happens when blockbuster movies are big risky bets -- the producers have to play it safe and try to make big budget movies that are new, but also familiar. That's why there are so many re-makes and re-booted movies/plots. No one wants to invest big $$$ in a film production project that doesn't have a built-in audience. Star Wars is still milking the same plots from the late 70s... but it *was* a big risk back when it first screened in theaters. Who would take that risk again? 

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dcawrey
dcawrey
7/7/2016 3:43:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: hollywood losing digital
I'm personally a bit exhausted by the big budget films. Sure, I understand Hollywood is making them in order to cater to a global audience. But the plots and effects seem so cookie cutter to me.

I prefer great actors with a good storyline. I don't need more superheroes. 

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 3:20:59 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: hollywood losing digital
@vnewman I think they trying to hold on to the old ways as long as possible, hopining tide will turn... 

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vnewman
vnewman
7/7/2016 3:12:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: hollywood losing digital
@batye - great point - they lose money, but still keep the status quo.  They must know something we don't.  Or they have their heads buried in the sand...

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Adi
Adi
7/7/2016 3:40:42 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Asian video streaming...
Yes, I'm quite amazed by the spread of Korean soaps. They're really popular, and not just with the Korean diaspora. I wonder what the secret is...??

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