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elizabethv
elizabethv
9/11/2016 5:31:18 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
@mhhf1ve - I have no idea what had to be done to get her off the list. It was all taken care of by her realtor and finance company. I know she didn't have to do much. She mostly just complained about it (and rightfully so.) The "funny" part is that she has been employed by the government for the last ten years, and they had completed a background check on her 2 months prior when she had relocated from Los Angeles to Phoenix - and nothing had been talked about or flagged then. And she wasn't on the list prior to starting the purchase of the home, it happened a few days before they went to close on the house. It was a nightmare for her and I can't imagine dealing with it myself. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
9/11/2016 4:21:56 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
> "is privacy actually good for anything?"

It's a bit concerning that there's a view that the younger generation(s) don't value privacy, but I don't think that's really true. Snapchat and the rise of encrypted messaging services seems to indicate that younger folks might just approach privacy differently than previous generations? 

But perhaps if we're really headed toward a Brave New World, then there won't be too many weird embarrassing things left to require certain kinds of privacy. Society will have genetically engineered people without weird traits.....

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
9/11/2016 4:16:27 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
@elizabethv > "... just what does one do to end up on the terrorist list?"

Uh, the better question is.. how does one prove that they shouldn't be on a terrorist list once they're on one??? That sounds like a bureaucratic nightmare...

And now I'm thinking we're living in Terry Gilliam's Brazil...

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
9/11/2016 3:58:04 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
> "Sometimes I think we're already living in Brave New World."

Brave New World...or 1984?


It's been a while since I've read those books, but.. we're pretty far from "feelies" and cloning people to be genetically engineered for a specific societal class?

I definitely think we're already way beyond the surveillance capabilities of 1984 -- but no one has been able to change the dictionaries because of wikipedia and edit histories.....

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faryl
faryl
9/10/2016 9:46:59 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
The issue isn't as much with the people who are perpetrating crimes and injuring others, as the government's ability to determine what constitutes criminal activity and to use information about its citizens to "subjectively connect the dots" in order to paint them a certain way. It's great when it helps foil a terrorist plot to injure people; not so great when the "terrorist" label is used to limit the rights/credibility of people the government perceives as a threat against power. I find it troubling that the government classifies whistleblowers, activists/hacktivists as terrorists and demonizes things like TOR, which has legitimate uses for valid privacy concerns (e.g., domestic violence victims who need to cover their tracks, or journalists protecting sources).

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faryl
faryl
9/10/2016 9:31:38 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
@elizabethv That pretty much sums up my issue with it. There's no transparency and little (if any) recourse for situations like your friend's (it's why I'm not a fan of any security measures that involve limiting the rights of people based on the no-fly list).

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elizabethv
elizabethv
9/9/2016 6:34:02 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
@faryl - I have my own doubts about the whole, "If you have nothing to hide it isn't a problem" concepts. My best friend, who I have known for over 15 years, since we were both in high school - found herself on a list of possible terrorists. She barely has enough political opinions to find a voice about them more often than not. Her life is consumed with her husband and kids, basketball, and her job as a nurse. She was born and raised in this country of European decent. None of that is to say she is incapable of being a terrorist, just that it's highly unlikely. But still she did, and it was a big enough deal to keep her from being able to close on the house her and her husband were trying to buy. It held the buy up a complete week, while the realtor and financers worked to get her name off the list. There were eventually successful, but ever since I've been curious - just what does one do to end up on the terrorist list? 

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batye
batye
9/5/2016 7:49:01 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
@Ariella I trut we are living in it now :) 

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batye
batye
9/5/2016 7:48:08 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exciting, but
@faryl  same is on my end, I could not agree more :) 

 

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Ariella
Ariella
8/31/2016 9:11:55 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Exciting, but
@JohnBarnes Sometimes I think we're already living in Brave New World.

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