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Ariella
Ariella
2/2/2017 12:03:27 PM
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Re: Innovators
@Adi I see, so when you watch ITV, you'd see commercials but not when you watch BBC, as the latter is funded? That's the difference between network television and PBS here. 

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Adi
Adi
2/2/2017 9:03:44 AM
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Re: Innovators
Ariella - ITV is the largest commercial broadcast channel in the UK. It is the equivalent of ABC/NBC/CBS/FOX in the US, just as the BBC is like PBS (but with a much, much higher share of TV viewership). 

Of course the way it works in the UK, when you buy a TV or sign up to pay-TV it is assumed that you will watch BBC and therefore you are liable for a TV license fee. You could, in theory, never watch BBC programs, and just watch ITV and other channels, but the TV license folks don't buy that. 

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Ariella
Ariella
2/1/2017 8:55:27 AM
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Re: Innovators
@Adi thanks for the explanation. One more question on British TV for you. There's iTV, which I know is distinct from BBC and the name behind major hits like "Downton Abbey." Is that a private co that is not included on standard British TV and that any viewers have to subscribe to in order to watch in the UK?

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
1/31/2017 10:03:55 PM
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Platinum
Re: Innovators
Amazon and Netflix topping the list is no surprise as we are able to see that already.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
1/31/2017 10:01:29 PM
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Platinum
Re: Innovators
Yes, that is an interesting question. Would love to know the answer.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/31/2017 9:28:20 PM
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Platinum
Re: OTT - Providers
Elizabeth,

Not only are most people not all that radical in their tastes or desires to explore, but one of the major components of entertainment for many people is talking about/sharing it with others (though of course there's the indie/hipster game of sharing it with a small group rather than everyone). So in entertainment, always, the big get bigger, both absolutely and relatively (until they get replaced, but even then the really big things have longer afterlives; consider how many fans there are for shows that have been off the air for decades, book series whose authors are long dead, etc.) So OTT may provide many niche opportunities but ultimately and overall it's goig to fatten the already fat. The long tails of the chain bookstores, and then of Amazon, revived the backlists of hundreds of thousands of writers, some long dead -- but they lifted bestsellers to heights never before seen.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
1/31/2017 3:34:13 PM
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Platinum
Re: OTT - Providers
@JohnBarnes - You're right, the other smaller OTT services are much more niche oriented than all-encompassing avenues for entertainment. CBS ALL ACCESS for instance, really only shows CBS shows, old and new. Which sounds great, but my dedication to CBS isn't exactly hours worth of endless entertainment. Sure, I enjoy some shows. And back in the day (when I was like 14 and a massive nerd) I would watch Dr. Quinn and Touched by An Angel and Walker, Texas Ranger and Early Edition, but I don't even know which of those shows made the CBS OTT line-up, and I do know Dr. Quinn is available on Amazon Prime. So is it worth me paying a monthly fee so I can have that access? Not even close. 

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Adi
Adi
1/31/2017 5:15:19 AM
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Re: Innovators
Ariella - The BBC's international arm, BBC Worldwide, is run as a commercial channel or production house outside of the UK. So you can see a lot of BBC content worldwide. Sometimes it's through partnerships and co-productions (as with PBS in the US) for specific shows but it also has a dedicated channel and negotiates carriage with pay-TV providers in several countries.

Also, keep in mind this is a survey of industry executives, not consumers. So there's greater awareness of some of the work the BBC has done, particularly with iPlayer which was well ahead of anyone else in the OTT space. Many technology companies and programmers have hired ex-BBC people, or worked with them as vendors or partners, or just seen case-studies and presentations at events, for example. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
1/30/2017 9:02:28 PM
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Platinum
Re: OTT - Providers
Elizabeth,

I think that's pretty much a safe bet. In nearly every other field of entertainment, the "big guys" turn out to be big in large measure because they're willing to do what it takes to be popular -- and vice versa, because a big entertainment company can't make a living on niche products.  So it makes sense that what people want to watch via OTT is pretty much what they want to watch via any other economic delivery system, and unsurprisingly, having ready access to what's already popular is a crushing advantage for OTT systems that have hooks to the already-big.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
1/30/2017 7:13:20 PM
User Rank
Platinum
OTT - Providers
I have to wonder if the giants are dominating the OTT market because they have the content and the power to do so, and the littler guys will just always struggle. I think CBS All Access might be struggling with their version of OTT. Since I had previously tried it and then canceled my subscription (the show I really care about I can watch for free from their website) and now they just emailed me and asked if I wanted to try another month free. Not sure if they changed something and now think another month free might persuade me to keep them or what. Either way, I wasn't that easily convinced. 

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