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dlr5288
dlr5288
3/31/2017 2:49:45 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Positive
Good points! I also get in moods where I don't want to see people and would rather have a conversation over text. However, most of the time, I find more satisfaction having a face to face conversation.

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vnewman
vnewman
3/2/2017 6:58:16 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Positive
I can go back and forth between both personality traits - it depends on my mood and how much sleep I've had!  I will say this: The preference for "hanging out online" is slowly seeping its way into the workforce in the form of people prefering to work remotely either on the road or from home and also to collaborate through video or chat instead of in person.  We are even starting to use these methods for recruiting whereas in the past, all of our efforts were on campus, in-person.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
2/28/2017 8:28:52 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Positive
Yes I 100% understand. With a busy work, school or other activities it is hard to hang out with friends in person. However, I still find that I get much more joy out of hanging out with friends in person than online or over the phone.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
2/23/2017 8:42:07 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Positive
@vnewman - By your post I would guess you're an introvert. As an introvert, I thrive in an online environment. I started doing online classes when they were first being rolled out and ended up completing two Master's Degree's completely online because I prefer them so much more to being in an actual classroom. But the online environment makes me wonder if people are showing a preference for being more "introverted" (since no one is truly 100% introvert or extrovert) or if there are true extroverts out there that still prefer a physical social scene to a virtual one. And where do the percentages lie? 

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vnewman
vnewman
2/21/2017 12:31:52 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Positive
Great article.  Frankly, it is much easier to "hang out" virtually than it is online.  In person contact takes a lot of "social energy" as I like to call it.  If you are already worn thin by school and a packed activity schedule, it isn't hard to understand how you would prefer a more "chill" type of interaction level with your friends.  

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Ariella
Ariella
2/21/2017 11:49:13 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Positive
@vnewman from th article:

Teens have been hanging out online for 20 years, but in 2017 they're doing it on group video chat apps, in a way that feels like the real thing, not just a poor substitute. Ranging in age from adolescents to their early 20s—the group loosely defined as "Generation Z" —these young people are leaving the apps open, in order to hang out casually with peers in a trend some call "live chilling."

This phenomenon is made possible by the sudden ubiquity of video chat, in messaging apps such as Kik and Facebook Messenger , as well as stand-alone apps including Houseparty, Fam , Tribe , Airtime and ooVoo....

These apps make sense now in part because more teens than ever have access to smartphones. In 2015, the Pew Research Center reported 73% of U.S. teens have access to a smartphone, and that figure is growing. Those teens are checking their phones on average more than 80 times a day, according to Deloitte .

It isn't just that teens have phones, and that the infrastructure required to handle multiple simultaneous video streams is more accessible to developers than ever. It is also that teens aren't getting out to socialize in real life like they once did. One in three teens told Pew that they hang out with friends outside of school less often than "every few days."

"To me that's where this story begins," says Ted Livingston , founder and chief executive of Kik, a messaging app with 300 million registered users that is especially popular with American teenagers. It is hard for older generations to understand how young people cope with this lack of physical hangtime, he says. "The answer is they're hanging out with their friends on their phone."

Mr. Livingston says that when teens leave Kik's group video chat open for hours, it is a sort of passive window into friends' homes and lives. This behavior isn't so different from the way Generation X would call friends after school, and millennials used AOL Instant Messenger and, later, text messaging to keep up with friends, says Ryan Hoover, founder of startup tracking service Product Hunt.

To a large extent, all these technologies have been an adaptation to teens' inability to access one another in person, says Jan Odiaga, assistant professor at Rush University College of Nursing in Chicago, who studies how technology influences activity levels in young people. The situation is worse than ever because of packed schedules, helicopter parenting and the decline of walkable neighborhoods.

The phenomenon is exemplified by a recent case that made national headlines : When parents in Maryland allowed their children to walk home from school on their own, police and child protective services got involved. Many parents feel the frustration that social pressures prevent them from allowing their children the same freedom of movement that they themselves had as teens.

The net effect, says Ms. Odiaga, is that teens are spending more time indoors, and are less active, than ever. Studies examining time use since 1965 show a significant decline in active time accelerating in the mid-1990s , to the point that young people today are sedentary for more than 10 hours a day, says Ms. Odiaga. We're at the point now, she adds, that the technology is also driving the trend.

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vnewman
vnewman
2/21/2017 11:30:26 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Positive
@Ariella, I tried to read the article, but it requires a paid subscription to get the full text.

Would you mind summing up the article for those of us who make it a practice not to pay for online content? :)

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Ariella
Ariella
2/21/2017 8:55:43 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Positive
On just this topic, the Wall Street Journal just posted an article yesterday, "For Generation Z, 'Live Chilling' Replaces Hanging Out in Person."

 


 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
2/21/2017 6:26:20 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Positive
I am sure that as more and more kids get older, after having grown up with the internet being so central to their lives, they will be cord cutters. This is a battle that cable will likely start having to fight in 10 years or so, with real force. Especially as cable companies already work to pull in cord cutters by appealing to them online. Shorter versions of Live TV to satisfy people's interest in watching whatever shows others are watching on TV will help keep cord cutters in the know, without a monthly subscription to a cable TV service. 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
2/21/2017 6:22:40 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Aussie Kids Trading TV Time for Internet
@srufolo1 - There's more overlap just in watching TV online, or accessing the internet from a SmartTV. Because realistically, it isn't that difficult to watch TV while you are on the internet from your phone. In fact I'd be willing to bet a fair number of people do this routinely. And really the question should be, how much attention are you paying to one or the other while doing both? 

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