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batye
batye
5/9/2016 3:08:17 AM
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Platinum
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
@mhhf1ve  I trust you are right and I think we gonna see more and more of  this technology in the future...

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Narayan Menon
Narayan Menon
4/19/2016 3:48:43 PM
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Author
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
Agree - LPWAN is building up to be a key player in the mix as well. LPWAN combines long range with low power consumption very well. Different from something like LTE-M - which targets longer ranges and low power consumption as well - but which is perhaps more suited to higher data rates.

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CarlosBriceno
CarlosBriceno
4/7/2016 2:20:01 PM
User Rank
Steel
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
Let's add LPWAN to the mix, bantamweight in data speed and power requirements but a heavy weight in range. Sigfox, LoRa, Ingenu, etc. are deploying these very long range, very low speed, very low power networks in unlicensed ISM bands, for now. LPWAN is designed for IoT use cases in which very long range, long battery life will be more important than data speed.

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Narayan Menon
Narayan Menon
4/7/2016 12:40:26 AM
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Author
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
It could end up being a group hug at the end of the day, as long as there's some refereeing to ensure that the cage fighters aren't stepping on each other. Radio resource coordination will be needed when multiple technologies use the same band.

For example, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and ZigBee can all use the 2.4GHz band. In a scenario where multiple such devices are collocated, radio resources will need to be smartly allocated such that frequency overlap, and hence interference, are inimized.

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Narayan Menon
Narayan Menon
4/7/2016 12:30:44 AM
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Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
I'm curious to see how they plan to achieve the 2 km range using high-frequency technology. High-frequency operation (and associated high bandwidth) don't go hand in hand with long range. Range is low with these technologies. For Wi-Fi, the range is shorter with 5GHz technology than in the 2.4GHz band. In fact, Wi-Fi reaches down into the 900MHz band with 802.11ah to try and deliver longer-range Wi-Fi suitable for some IoT use cases. Mesh networking, perhaps?

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
4/6/2016 1:13:37 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
> "we're going to see more than one access technology linked together to create that "longer-distance" link, e.g. a short-range local access link getting interworked with a cellular link (in a gateway node) to create that longer-distance connection. The role of gateways will be quite crucial here."

Agreed. Gateways are going to become quite important -- but they may also change and start to be integrated into devices themselves to create more mesh network architecture. It will be very interesting to see how all the spectrum plays together. The cage match might end in a group hug, hopefully.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
4/6/2016 1:09:56 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
> "Using mm-wave signals very directionally can mitigate interference in short-range settings, and the higher frequencies can provide higher data rates over short links."

I'm not entirely sure how Starry Wireless is getting around the range limitations of mm-wave signals, but they're probably beaming some high-power mm-waves to get 2 kilometer transmissions to reach the "last mile" of residential coverage?

http://www.wired.com/2016/01/aereo-founder-prepares-for-battle-with-new-wireless-startup/

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Narayan Menon
Narayan Menon
4/6/2016 11:47:24 AM
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Author
Re: I suspect the future is somehow-cabled.
Such an approach would certainly be workable for certain IoT segments and applications. A bunch of in-home sensor based applications could use that very local link and interconnect through the router in the home to get to the external world. Similarly in hotspots as well, e.g. the coffee shop scenario you mention. The longer-distance link could be wireline, in these cases.

The challenge would be in certain other segments/ applications, such as health monitoring/ body area networks, where the individual can be on the move, and wired tethering would be difficult. Similar story for automotive applications, where you would likely use a cellular link to communicate from the vehicle to the external world. The good thing, though, is that these interlinking wireless technologies often operate in different bands (e.g. cellular and ZigBee), so the interference between them should be limited in most cases.

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Narayan Menon
Narayan Menon
4/6/2016 11:33:04 AM
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Author
Re: Still waiting for software defined radios...
Yes, that's correct. The choice of access technology, and of device types, will be driven by the application/ use case. In many cases, we're going to see more than one access technology linked together to create that "longer-distance" link, e.g. a short-range local access link getting interworked with a cellular link (in a gateway node) to create that longer-distance connection. The role of gateways will be quite crucial here.

Millimeter-wave technology is interesting. Using mm-wave signals very directionally can mitigate interference in short-range settings, and the higher frequencies can provide higher data rates over short links. To create a longer link would require mm-wave links to be meshed together, or interconnected to a Wi-Fi or cellular link.

Narayan

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/6/2016 7:06:36 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I suspect the future is somehow-cabled.
ElizabethV, cable-linked microwireless stations are of course not inevitable, but it seems to me that there are many powerful economic players who are going to find them interesting and maybe compelling. If I own a large office building and the engineers say I can configure many large networks that are the exact shape of my rental spaces, with very high bandwidth, no interference, and no areas zoned out -- not to mention the security advantages -- and the cell phone company is saying "No, no, you must have one big slow port with lots of interference and interceptibility" -- I'm going to be on the phone to my Congressbeast that day. Ditto the city bus company -- keeping riders quietly engaged in something other than thinking about how much they don't like each other is a lot easier if everyone on the bus has perfect "wireless" (actually, perhaps, seat by seat antennae cabled to a router that then sends it to a rooftop or under-the-bus antenna). The cell phone companies will not be able to holler "We ownz all the microwaves cause the rules say so!" for very long if any significant economic force becomes aware of the possibilities.

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