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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
6/6/2016 2:54:13 AM
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Platinum
Re: EU Wants Amazon, Netflix to Include European Content
Monetization is vital--those who figure out how to monetize content (and Facebook is the current king) will prevail.    We have to figure out how to leverage it for our own benefit by being smart consumers.   It is a tall order--but it can be possible--everyone can potentially be a winner:

Facebook increasing monetization options
Facebook is exploring the potential of sharing revenue with content creators to spur growth. Meanwhile, Instagram has launched features that let smaller brands boost ad revenue.

Bloomberg (6/2) 

 

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faryl
faryl
5/31/2016 2:40:13 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: EU Wants Amazon, Netflix to Include European Content
For some reason I thought you were in the UK! must be the accent! :-D

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dlr5288
dlr5288
5/31/2016 11:27:29 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: EU Wants Amazon, Netflix to Include European Content
Yeah over here in the US we even have to pay for things on YouTube if we want to watch a whole movie or episode. You can always find clips and that sort of thing but never all of the content.

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faryl
faryl
5/30/2016 1:32:35 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not too Surprised.....
Interesting history - thank you for sharing that! Re: public television... with Sesame Street moving to HBO and needing to be a PBS sponsor to get access to most of their streaming content, it's not something I take for granted will be around much longer!

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faryl
faryl
5/30/2016 1:28:22 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not too Surprised.....
I think we've already lost it over here :-/

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
5/29/2016 11:56:59 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not too Surprised.....
faryl,

Well, yes, you're dealing with two intersecting traditions here.

When the telegraph was developed in the US the country was still in the grip of a wave of anti-"internal improvement" sentiment -- canals and national roads, built mostly with public money and foreign-bought bonds, had been something of a flop, whereas railroads -- in the US, entirely private -- were booming. And the paralyzed government of that era (it's the period leading up to the civil war) wasn't in much shape to create a national telegraph service even if the public had wanted one. So we got private telegraph companies, at first, and then because the natural number of telegraph companies was one, we got our old familiar monopoly, Western Union. (If Bell hadn't sued them successfully, they'd also have been The Phone Company. As it was, they were the model for ATT/ITT).

In most European nations, the telegraph was seen as a natural extension of what the Post Office did, so telegraph systems were government operated, from post offices, which later took over phone and in some cases radio and TV for a while, because they were the "communications office".  (Ironically, many of those European post offices were partly or wholly copied from Ben Franklin's US Post Office).

Meanwhile on the arts front: European "high" or "good" art had always been supported by aristocrats.  After the many revolutions and upheavals of 1789  through 1848, the aristocrats had much less money and power, but many of their old functions were taken over by the state -- supporting symphonies, museums, theaters, etc. being just one of them, and a popular one since it meant greatly improving public access to entertainment. But in the US, the arts were commercial from the git-go -- popular entertainment that lived on ticket sales -- and our numerous and vociferous Protestant preachers could attack the arts as wicked private businesses, the equivalent of saloons, casinos, or brothels, whereas in Europe the arts lived under the wing of the government and such preaching smacked of treason both to the state and to the established church.

So...in a mighty coincidence, Americans have centuries of expecting that communication systems and entertainment will be private and not subject to much government control.  Europeans expect quite the opposite.

As for whether this will ever change ... I think we will probably have a king in the US before we have the equivalent of the BBC. I'm frankly surprised that we even have public television.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
5/29/2016 8:50:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not too Surprised.....
Let's make sure to continue to keep the faith!!

 

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faryl
faryl
5/29/2016 1:33:28 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not too Surprised.....
It generally seems to me that the EU at least appears to somewhat have the consumers' better interest in mind with stufff like this.

American legislation always feels politcs-partisan-ego driven; any benefits to consumers is incidental.

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faryl
faryl
5/29/2016 1:29:25 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: EU Wants Amazon, Netflix to Include European Content
It seems like it would be in Netflix & Amazon's interest to provide more content to European subscribers as well - a larger selection of decent content is more likely to draw subscribers than a smaller one.

That's why I'm guessing there's some sort of restriction currently in place preventing them from doing so.

(from a layperson's perspective) :-)

YouTube content is frequently unavailable to you guys as well, yeah?

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dlr5288
dlr5288
5/27/2016 11:15:05 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: EU Wants Amazon, Netflix to Include European Content
Yeah true. I figured that that's why there not super quick to jump on this. I do hope the licensing agreements can become less strict because I want to see this new content!

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