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clrmoney
clrmoney
6/30/2016 12:23:26 PM
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Internet is Great
Yes it is with the inter browser explorer google chrome firefox to explore tthe web and uses for researching and collecting data and I think it is mandatory that we keep it and keep it up to date. Because I think it has become a value to all of us.

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Michelle
Michelle
6/30/2016 1:13:50 PM
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Internet of People
I have often wondered what the longterm costs might be for easily accessible information that's always available. Modern day society is easily connected, but doesn't seem to engage in a lot of deep thought or analysis. This is troubling for our collective future. Parents are on the front lines to fix such things, but may not even be aware of the dangers of unlimited access. Hopefully, we will soon start to see a shift towards better online habits at ealier ages.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
6/30/2016 9:31:47 PM
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Re: Internet of People
@Michelle - I completely agree, parents are on the line to fix problems that are just starting to become obvious where the internet is concern. But I fear many parents don't believe they are the problem they really can be, or perhaps just think "not my kids!" Either way, I fear there is fear more ignorance where the problem lies than their is awareness. And this is only going to make the problem worse. 

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dlr5288
dlr5288
6/30/2016 11:44:24 PM
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Re: Internet of People
I agree! It's scary how kids are with the internet these days. They've become too dependent on it, in my opinion. It's something that worries me for the later generations.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/3/2016 10:18:29 PM
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Re: Internet of People
Michelle, Elizabeth, Dir5288,

For questions about what the net is doing to human brains, I highly recommend Nicholas Carr's THE SHALLOWS.  Scary reading.  For amusement, after you've read it, read the Amazon 1- and 2-star reviews of it and you'll see exactly the nonthought nonprocesses he's talking about in action!

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faryl
faryl
6/30/2016 9:43:50 PM
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Re: Internet of People
Tangentially related - I watched a documentary on Amazon Prime (called "Inner Worlds, Outer Worlds") that discussed - among other things - the nature of learning and knowledge. One point it made was how in earlier days, people had more general knowledge, so it was more accessible. Later, as knowledge broke off into specific subjects such as physics and biology, things became compartmentalized and the amount of knowledge expanded so much, that people became limited to how much they can know & learn; knowledge became less accessible. (It's kind of a "metaphysics" themed series, that ties science in with some comparitive religion - so it also suggested a tie-in to the theme of eating from the Tree of Knowledge/being cast out of Eden) Now, theoretically, knowledge is accessible to anyone with an Internet connection, but there is so much of it that it's like trying to drink from a firehose, so we often miss out on the opportunity for engaging in that deeper level of thought and analysis.

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Michelle
Michelle
11/5/2016 12:10:07 PM
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Re: Internet of People
@faryl sorry for the delay in replying - I haven't seen that documentary yet, but I can see how the research findings are true. We live in an information-rich era. I hope we move back to deep thought and analysis as a society.

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faryl
faryl
11/29/2016 3:11:37 AM
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Re: Internet of People
It's my turn to apologize for a delayed response :) I agree. Though recent media coverage indicates that higher education and thought and reason are considered by some as negative qualities. (Leave it to America to make even education a political/partisan issue!)

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afwriter
afwriter
6/30/2016 3:28:53 PM
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The internet is alive
I believe that it has lived up to its potential so far.  It is almost like it is a living thing that continues to develop and learn new skills as it ages.

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Michelle
Michelle
6/30/2016 5:13:48 PM
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Re: The internet is alive
@af just like the AI in Terminator? I think it's grown up to become really useful and hurtful too. So many harmful effects come from humans, of course.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
6/30/2016 8:53:51 PM
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Re: The internet is alive
I completely agree! I feel like it's lived up to what it can do as for right now. Hopefully when the future develops more and more technology advancements the Internet will be able to keep up.

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faryl
faryl
6/30/2016 9:57:40 PM
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Re: The internet is alive
I agree! Another cultural anthropologist, Gabriella Coleman, wrote a fascinating book on the evolution of activism performed by people banding together online (and offline) as Anonymous. Without having the internet to connect, communicate & coordinate, events such as the Arab Spring not only would be going unnoticed by the rest of the world; the citizens impacted by such events would not be empowered to relay what's going on and find ways to advocate for themselves and unite together. The internet not only has the power to educate & connect, I think it helps humanize people too. Things going on across the world take on a different meaning when you are able to see firsthand accounts of people who are effected by them.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/2/2016 6:28:29 AM
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Re: The internet is alive
@faryl - you make a great point, the internet can certainly be valuable as well. Though I am not positive as to the effect it has had on protesting and changing the world. Anymore it seems like all people are willing to do is a sign a virtual petition. Outside of that, actually helping seems to fall by the wayside. Signing virtual petitions have no doubt made a difference, but there are some situations that need a little more than your typed name in a box.

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 12:40:38 PM
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Re: The internet is alive
afwriter, I agree.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
6/30/2016 3:57:36 PM
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Beyond potential...
In my opinion, internet is not just living up to its potential. It is well beyond...

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
6/30/2016 4:00:19 PM
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Mindset
 It is neither good nor bad; it is how we use it that matters....


This is pretty obvious not just with the internet but with any activity that needs moderation. It is just the human ability to set that limitation and maintain the level of control. It is all the mindset that matters here.

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faryl
faryl
6/30/2016 10:00:41 PM
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Re: Mindset
Exactly! Even water can be harmful. Like anything, moderation (as in "not excessive", not as in "moderating content") & intention are key.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
6/30/2016 11:17:56 PM
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Re: Mindset
Yes, Intention, self control and personal judgement are the key factors. 

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faryl
faryl
6/30/2016 11:33:57 PM
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Re: Mindset
Unfortunately, the second two seem to be in short supply these days!

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dcawrey
dcawrey
7/4/2016 1:55:42 PM
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Re: Mindset
Interesting thought here about the early days of email. 

With social media, you could draw some parallels. We're now seeing people share way too much on social media sites, similar to the early days of email. I think we're starting to see a pull back from that, but intriguing to see how people react to these new communications technologies. 

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/4/2016 2:12:43 PM
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Re: Mindset
I agree with similar patterns back in time of initial email era. Whatever may be the medium it would be ok if there is no obsessive behaviour. I am often surprised to see some folks with their hourly(or even more frequent?) status updates like eatingat this place, checked into ...., driving by ,,,etc. I don't feel those kind of details are always necessary to be too publice, at least in my view.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 1:29:54 AM
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Re: Mindset
@dcawrey yes, I see the same patern with changes in emails and social media... interesting 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 4:00:07 PM
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Re: Mindset
Everything has to be in balance--it is how one utilizes it no question--but such evolution requires a sense of self-censorship that may well be required to ensure the long-term viability of the internet as we know it.

 

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 12:40:56 PM
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Re: Mindset
Wow everyone has good points on this topic.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
6/30/2016 4:05:25 PM
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Online Vs Offline
Balance time online: Model a healthy balance between your online and offline activities.

 

This is a perfect fact that everyone must follow. But is that what is happening...i doubt 100%. As socail networking is evolving at unlimited extent, people are getting obsessed to have their presense felt by all means. So in that process that balance is certainly getting lost too often.


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DHagar
DHagar
6/30/2016 6:43:38 PM
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Re: Online Vs Offline
@ms.akkineni, I fully agree.  We are out of balance on this.  The need to stay "connected" has created an obsession to be "aware" of everything - which limits what we can know and digest.

There is a great book, "Shallows" by Nicolas Carr that validates our shortened attention span.  The great news, according to his research, is that we can reverse the habit patterns and construct deeper thinking by exercising our thinking.

So to Joseph's great point, we are over-indulging on the Internet and need to develop a better balance.  Just because we can do everything doesn't mean we should.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
6/30/2016 10:57:59 PM
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Re: Online Vs Offline
@DHagar: Great to connect back.

Very well stated facts about internet usage. Thanks for the mention about thebook and I will surely try to give it a read. 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/1/2016 5:55:27 PM
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Re: Online Vs Offline
@ms.akkineni, likewise!  Sounds good - you will enjoy the book.  The important thing is that it confirms it is a "real" reforming of the way we think - so it isn't just an assumption, but that we can "unplug", "re-engage", and "repattern" our brains to keep them in a thinking mode - good news!

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/1/2016 6:35:32 PM
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Re: Online Vs Offline
@DHagar:

Certainly sounds very interesting. Those key insights sure grabbed attention. Thanks for that.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
6/30/2016 9:37:39 PM
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Re: Online Vs Offline
@ms.akkineni - I am sure most of us struggle with a healthy balance between our phones/the internet and real life. Recently, my kids and I went outside to play. I realized I had left my phone in the house once we were already settled and set up outside. I decided it would be good to leave my phone in the house a few hours, and focus on spending time with my kids. So I never bothered to go in and grab it. When my husband came home, he was extremely upset. He had attempted to call and text me numerous times, and I never answered or replied. He really had just wanted to know what exactly it was I had asked him to get at the store - but in reality, it could have been something far more serious. He could have been in a car accident or something of that nature. I would have been completely unaware because I had decided to "disconnect" for a few hours. When I told him why I didn't have the phone, he settled down and was fine with the whole situation. But now I've thought twice before leaving my phone behind. We don't have a house phone line - something that a lot of people my age are leaving behind. And if something happens, and someone wants to get ahold of me, it's not just the internet, it's my phone too. 

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
6/30/2016 11:15:06 PM
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Re: Online Vs Offline
@elizabethv:

Absolutely agree. The main culprit is the mobile data and how these smart phones wiped off all barriers of not being connected.

In your note as you summarized your expereince, it makes all the sesnse how certain situations create all unnecessary tensions just because we chose to not carry the phone. But what i would say is what matters is how you choose to use your device. I am not a person that prefers to be socially active. But i do have a teenage kid who feels absolutely handicapped if not carrying the phone any time and all the time, which make me totally annoyed. But that seems to be norm for kids of that age. But i don't buy that idea at all. But at the same time not quiet sure how to change that habit. It has even become a culture than a habit. 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
6/30/2016 9:30:00 PM
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The dangers of the internet
This definitely highlights all of the problems found in conjunction with the internet. There was actually a social experiment that has been floating around Facebook, used to highlight the problem most of us suffer with, having our phones in our hands at all times. Phones have put the internet in our pockets. I absolutely love being able to find the answer to my questions with just simple searches. But I hold two Master's Degrees, and even taught college classes, where a few weeks worth of projects focused on locating reliable information and just how to find it. Critical thinking has been a part of my life for decades now, so much so that I have my toddlers working on critical thought. But I know just how rare this is - I taught college classes afterall. And in a society where delayed-gratification is a thing of the past, and critical thought is a nuisance, the internet can be an extrememly dangerous thing. I shudder to think of just how easily misinformation is spread on this avenue of information I see as more benefit than hindrance. "A lie gets half way around the world before the truth can get its pants on." -Winston Churchill. And he said that before the internet existed! 

The biggest problem, I see, that I doubt many parents realize - is that if their teenagers are exchanging naked pictures with one another, and someone decides to report that. They can be slapped with child pornography and sexual assault charges that lead to them being put on the Sex Offenders list. For teenagers, this would be life-altering. Even if the pictures were exchanged willing, this can still happen. For some reason, it needs to be said that our actions on the internet can affect us in real life - to a very serious extent. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/3/2016 10:29:13 PM
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The online affairs "problem"
Maybe I just have a nasty mind, but online affairs eroding families and relationships seems to me one of the most obvious consequences, and the level of it doesn't surprise me at all. Consider how much the lowly automobile changed American sex mores in less than 20 years, just by giving young people somewhere to go where older people wouldn't be watching; or the liberalization of divorce laws and access to birth control a couple generations later. There's a reason why there are more than seven billion of us, and that reason uses every opportunity it gets!

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/3/2016 10:46:15 PM
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The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
One of the smarter educators of gifted and talented kids I've known straight up called it "Google brain" -- the instant looking up, processing, and then forgetting of every fact in a student project or paper. This works all right if a student is trying to write a straight-up expository report, although the student is likely to miss any controversies in the field (since s/he won't notice that what she wrote on page 2 was contradicted on page 4).  But it's a disaster for the synthesis of original ideas because those come from comparing disparate sources plus (sometimes) laboratory or experiential evidence.  It's a disaster for creative poetry or fiction because the student is neither a fox (who knows many things; all they know is what they just looked up) nor a hedgehog (who knows one important thing; you don't know an idea is important unless you retain it and apply it to more situations). Instead, they tend to write to fit a pre-existing armature, just slotting Googled facts into a Hero's Journey or Save the Cat outline.

If big people talk about ideas, average people talk about people, and small people talk about things ... well, the internet is slowly eroding the source of ideas, and it's certainly true that already it's mostly one big device for talking about people.  It's hard not to see that as making us smaller.

Which gives a whole new ominous cast to the phrase, "internet of things."

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/4/2016 12:46:17 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
JohnBarnes,

While I agree that what you describe is happening in the short term, I think in the long term, there will be ever more advanced versions of "Clippy" that might be able to point out the shortcoming of poorly researched writing. So instead of just saying "I see you're writing a cover letter, can I help format it?" Clippy3.0 might be able to say "I see you're contradicting yourself in this expository report, do you think you should revise your thesis?"

or.. maybe not. 

AlphaGo Next will probably take over the world and eliminate the need for human thought anyway... 

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 1:35:11 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@mhhf1ve interesting point/observation it like semi- smart A.I. entering our life... one way or other...

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/5/2016 4:13:26 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@batye, yup. Advanced AI is not going to stop improving. Perhaps we'll have some people looking into the ethical aspects to make sure we don't create an evil AI program, but I don't think we'll even know what kind of AI we're creating while we create it. There's no way to tell if a human baby will grow up to become a murderer, so I doubt we'll be able to figure it out for a piece of software either. 

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:19:40 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@mhhf1ve yes, you are right, as with everything in life, you never know... or what if ? question will always be here :) ... price of technology enetering our life...

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:19:40 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@mhhf1ve yes, you are right, as with everything in life, you never know... or what if ? question will always be here :) ... price of technology enetering our life...

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/5/2016 7:28:28 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mhf1ve,

I think "much more likely not" because the inability to hold a substantial body of ideas in memory and operate on them there is both exactly what is being atrophied and exactly what would be needed to get any benefit from Super-Clippy's points. And at least the first few generations of it will require that students actually understand what it is telling them. Large numbers of students already think of academic writing as producing an acceptable/salable product that must get past an inspector who will then authorize paying for it in grades, with no connection to any mental process at any step in the process (which is part of why so many of them have no problem with having someone else do the work).  Giving them one more quality-checker will raise the prices at the paper-writing services and probably induce the creation of "auto-think" AIs, but it will only increase, not mitigate, the disaster that is Google-brain.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/5/2016 1:05:10 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
JohnBarnes,

I agree (and I was being a bit facetious with my suggestion of a Super-Clippy), but I also think part of the problem with students now is the gamification of education -- where kids just try to optimize their performance on tests in order to get the required certifications for whatever the educational systems currently demand. Standardized testing creates an environment that doesn't encourage honest learning as much as rote memorization and a goal of meeting minimum standards.

Optimistically, there will *always* be a small population of people who are learning because they enjoy the subject or simply want to improve themselves. Pessimisically, that small population may never increase in size.... 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/6/2016 8:02:55 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mhhf1ve,

 I think we do disagree somewhat, but perhaps more in emphasis. Students can't do much in the way of critical, original, or independent thought if they have to look everything up, because they never know when they should be looking things up.  That means not only loading tne memory with a solid grounding of plain old dull facts, via the efficient memory loading techniques of rote and repetition, but also training the student to not just pull answers back in the same format given, but to pull them out in useful combinations and from different access paths. All of which efficient search engines teach them NOT to do.

It's the phenomenon very observable in math instruction (where I've spent a bit too much of my life) that a student who doesn't have the multiplication table reflexively has to use too much processing space to get through basic computations so that they don't have room for anything higher, and has little to no ability to notice patterns or situations that they can exploit in their work. It's just as observable in students who read all of history as if everyone from the dawn of time had the ideas and attitudes of the two big political parties during the Obama administration, or who can see nothing in a work of literature except whether they liked the characters and who would play the lead. All the information in the world can be right next to the student but until they have enough memory in their minds, not in their gadgets to access it and work with it directly, it does them no good.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/6/2016 8:32:11 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
JohnBarnes,

I think I understand what you're saying, but let me ask you: "do you think there has been irreversible genetic brain damage in the younger generations?" Adults who are over 30yo now had to memorize phone numbers and maybe the periodic table and multiplication tables up to 12x12 or maybe even 15x15... Whereas adults in the 1500s were largely illiterate, but some educated people back then could memorize amazing amounts of materials, quoting bible passages easily and reciting classic prose or poetry. Have our modern brains atrophied since the Renaissance or since 4BC? I don't think so. I think our brains have been trained to perform and focus on different tasks. Sure, there are some kids who can't seem to put together a logical argument, but that's probably always been true. Are we running out of people who can? Or are there more people than ever before in history who can understand Calculus? Maybe we're not cultivating Einsteins or geniuses like Srinivasa Ramanujan... but I think if you were to survey the entire population of humans today, you might be surprised at how functional people are. 

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 3:45:10 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@mhhf1ve interesting observation and I trust you are right it like technology changing us... force us to become smarter to survive in new reality... or new IT age :) and no other way around...

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/7/2016 7:52:56 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mhhf1ve, batye,

No, the idea that the internet is making us smarter, let alone forcing us to become smarter, is just wrong, contradicted by an abundance of evidence in everything from the decline of working vocabulary in high school students (decreased about 40% since 1960) to the explosion of "executive function disorders" in colleges (students who can't remember or follow a list of steps) to the loss of ready-recall in young "skiled" workers (the "skilling" just does not stick anymore). A few engineers and scientists have to be very smart to make the internet work better, but for the vast majority of people, it's a pacifier that slowly makes them dumber -- which is exactly what our present market needs, uncritical consumers with poor impulse control.

Thanks to the Dunning-Kruger effect, however, student and general population self-esteem is reaching an all time high.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/7/2016 1:34:48 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
JohnBarnes,

I never said the internet is making us smarter! I doubt the human brain evolves on a time scale in which the internet would make any difference to our brains. Our brains are flexible. It's a double edged sword that way. So if we exercise our collective brains in the right way, we can get millions of high school students taking AP calculus. If we don't, we get millions who just sit around watching reality TV and youtube videos all day.

All is not lost. The human population still has plenty of genetic variation. Unless we start implementing some GATTACA-like rules, genetic chance will generally give us a top 1 percentile that's smart enough to figure out nuclear fusion and general artificial intelligence software. If we do start trying to genetically engineer our kids, well.. then who knows what kind of population we'll have. Maybe 50% geniuses. Maybe 100% good-looking idiots.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/7/2016 1:44:15 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
Psychologists, by the way, have seen a possibly spurious rise in IQ over the last 100yrs. Sure, IQ isn't a great measure of intelligence, but it's a standardized metric that has existed for many decades.

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2013/03/smarter.aspx

The human population is probably not getting any smarter or dumber, but we are more educated than we were 100 yrs ago. It depends on what kind of education we provide -- and that will have an effect on what kids know.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/8/2016 7:20:51 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@mhh1ve - It doesn't surprise me that overal IQ has increased, but it also wouldn't surprise me if that number started dropping again. But you're right, IQ is really a measure of overal retained information, not necessarily knowledge. More than anything, I would say critical thought has flown right out the window in the last 5 to 10 years or so.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/11/2016 3:59:05 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
> "More than anything, I would say critical thought has flown right out the window in the last 5 to 10 years or so."

The last decade is far too short a time span for anything permanent to happen to the human population's overall intelligence... 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/18/2016 7:24:19 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mhhf1ve,

 

"The last decade is far too short a time span for anything permanent to happen to the human population's overall intelligence..."


First of all, the reference was to critical thinking rather than intelligence, so the response is beside the point. Secondly, in fact for decades, there has been an about 3-point per decade rise in IQ, enough so that renormalization is required regularly, probably attributable to a wider use of critical and categorical thinking at earlier ages, but which has begun to slow and reverse in some economically advanced nations in the last decade. And finally, the abundance of evidence about environmental effects of information-poor (i.e. media-rich) environments on intelligence shows clear links between what kind of communication a kid spends time with and the kid's eventual functioning intelligence -- and early childhoods last a bit less than a decade.

Not buying that handwave at all. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/18/2016 7:35:05 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mhhf1ve,

It's not so much that people are more educated as that they are differently educated, and that more of it comes in a school structure. And the process is hitting its limits:

http://www.informationweek.com/mobile/mobile-devices/as-iqs-fall-can-gamification-help/d/d-id/1109936?

The trouble is, we appear to be building a magic library in which the genies can instantly fetch you any book, open to the right page, but fewer and fewer people know enough to ask a proper question or understand the answer. And the defenders of the internet's corrosion of the mind keep telling us how many books there are and how fast the genies fly.

 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:55:53 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
Here is another question in the same vein:  Should we not utilize our abilities in more "productive" ways than say, memorizing phone numbers?    We have to more than just 
"Factoids".     It is part of evolution--right?

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/18/2016 7:28:43 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mpouraryan,

Although I could mount a pretty good defense of memorizing phone numbers -- arbitrary memorization is in fact a useful skill and you might as well practice on something that can be handy in an emergency -- the point is that genuine effective creative thought relies on a deep understanding of the concepts, both general and particular, on which one is operating. Moving information from an easily-found window to your own window and clicking to submit your pile of information is not only the opposite of that creative process; it's exactly that pile-of-factoids approach you're decrying.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/18/2016 3:07:08 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
The first to fix and to transform is to realize the problem--the question is how to solve it.   Recommendations?  

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:58:17 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
What's so different than researching things "digitally" vs. "physically"?   It seems to me that the possibilities are ever so limitless?   As for Math specifically--the "wide and deep" focus as a result of Common Core achieves the very objectives you've had in mind (and I know there has been a lot of controversy about it...but I have seen the positive effects)....

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 12:46:07 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
I think the internet  has gone beyond its potential. I believe we are using it appropriately. But then, who defines what is appropriate.

It is up to the user and n how they use the internet to determine if it provides benefit to them.

If someone is looking for a fact about a topic and only use wikipedia or a blog without doing additional research from credible sources, is that the fault of the internet or the user. It is the user's fault because the internet provides credible and non-credible sources.

 

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 12:49:46 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
Saying, "The problems we are experiencing with the Internet are our fault. We have become enamored with our ability to connect; we have become obsessed as a society. Putting boundaries in place can help correct the problem."

is a statement I totally disagree with. Consumer did not create email, social media, the internet, VOD, OTT, texting, and other technologies that distract people from their daily activities, companies created this using the lame excuse that it would enrich our lives because our lives were so lousy before technology. Know we are starting to see the research that all this technology usage has side-effects and some have long-term effects.

Advertising and marketing has made consumer believe they need this technology and need to stay connected when they don't. People lived their live just fine without this technology.

 

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 12:51:14 PM
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Internet living up to its potential
The very fact that companies have to establish rules for healthy internet use proves that companies are the reason consumers have this problem because consumers didn't create the internet.


Set rules for Internet use: A good set of rules should include things like the amount of time kids are allowed to be online, what types of content are appropriate and whom it's okay to chat with, as well as proper online conduct and good Internet citizenship.

Balance time online: Model a healthy balance between your online and offline activities.

Distinguish between fact and opinion: Teach your family how the Internet works, and encourage critical thinking. Train them to use a variety of online resources and to always check, question and verify what they see online.

Keep personal facts private: Ensure that you understand the risks involved in making private or personal information public online. Discuss and evaluate online relationships as you would any other relationship in your life.

Case predicted that we would either learn to put healthy limits on our use of the Internet, or we would not survive as a society. Since it is my business to connect people to the Internet, I am hopeful that we apply a healthy, responsible and measured approach to its use and realize the incredible benefits that it promises.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/31/2016 1:56:51 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
Rules well defined. I believe more or less most of us practice these rules today.

When we think about internet usage in office, majority of the companies have limitations to internet usage.

I often get very concerned  about mobile internet usage for teenage kids. We can only guard their internet usage to some extent but not all of it.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
7/31/2016 6:15:59 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
Younger kids having this much access to the internet is definitley a scary thing. At least in my eyes. When I was younger I would play outside or hang out with friends, not constantly looking at a phone or tablet.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/31/2016 6:25:45 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
@dlr5288:

Absolutely scares me as well.

We all did the same. We didn't grow up with internet or tablet in hand. We had lot of outdoor free play time. That seemlessly helped us in coordination skills. Now if we look at kids, they are so much glued to their smart phones doing their own stuff. Mine takes 5/10 mis to respond if i ask something, if i am lucky. I am not at all happy about that.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
7/31/2016 8:57:30 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
Yes I know!

My younger sister is always on it and can't hold a conversation at times. It's beyond frustrating!

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
8/21/2016 10:59:05 AM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
OMG, I feel so frustrated and helpless at times.

I ask a question and my son doesn't even get the question because his focus is not there. Any time I never get a response back any sooner than 5/10 mins and often times i have to repeat the question. That keeps bothering me a lot.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
8/30/2016 1:39:14 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
Yes it's super frustrating! Sometimes I'll be having what I think is a conversation with one of my sisters and then realize they're not paying attention at all because they're on their phones..

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
8/31/2016 12:01:16 AM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
LOL. This seems to be very commom observation. I have a feeling that this only can get worse going forward. And that really makes me scary.

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dlr5288
dlr5288
8/31/2016 9:09:24 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
Yes same here I completely agree. It will only get worse..I'm praying it doesnt though..

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
8/31/2016 10:42:55 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
I wish it would not go too far and good luck to your wishful thinking.

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batye
batye
9/5/2016 7:06:41 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
@ms.akkineni  I would say it all depends on each of us, as we are in charge :) as global users/community - how I see it :) 

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
9/30/2016 8:08:59 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
Absolutely we are accountible for our own behaviour, addictions and consequences. But the younger teens don't get that concept yet, though they understand. They are more like going through the flow, following trend thinking that is too cool for now at this age and time.

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batye
batye
9/5/2016 7:04:28 PM
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Re: Internet living up to its potential
@dlr5288  I do hope it will improve and get better... 

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/31/2016 1:52:07 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
People lived their live just fine without this technology. 

Agree, We all did.

But the answer could be No if we think of our younger generation that currently breathe, eat and live internet and its social aspect. I personally see my teenanger going crazy if his phone is misplaced for just a couple of minutes. And that totally looks insane to me. But unfortunately i have not much control to this trend or behaviour and also i get dismissed for me not being well tuned into the trend.

Going back to the subject of this message, ofcourse even the youger generation are not born to be internet crazy. They just adapted the trend and got obsessive over time just because all the technology existed.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/31/2016 1:09:49 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
It is in the end up to all who are "consumers" to decide--but the creators have to make sure that they understand their audience and do their best to anticipate.   That's the key. 

Onward to August w/all its' possibilities  :)

 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/8/2016 7:18:59 AM
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Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@JohnBarnes - The internet has most definitely hastened the death of scholarly research. As someone who has spent a number of years teaching college classes online, there was rarely a class where I didn't have a student no more than copy and paste random paragraphs found on the internet and turn that in as their entire assignment. Not one original sentence in the bunch. They would even go so far as to do the same thing on their discussion posts more often than not. Even when students could be bothered to write their own sentences, it was still rare to see them have their own opinions, much less the capability to support them. My 3-year-old has literally come up with better arguments than my students. It's insane what education is becoming anymore.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/11/2016 8:02:25 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
ElizabethV,

Yep, the exchange/consumer model at work. I hand you n pages, you tell me how smart I am and give me a Finished a Course Green Stamp, roughly 40 semester Green Stamps or 60 quarter Green Stamps equals one Give the Kid an Income badge. What does where I got the pages from or whether there's anything coherent on them have to do with the exchange? I (or my parents)paid good money for those pages!

The internet is a place where that attitude can flourish; just consider how often we refer to what comes through it as "content", in a way rather similar to what plumbers call "liquids." I.e. doesn't matter whether it's pure clean drinking water or ... other content .... because we just worry about the pipes.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:54:35 PM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
I respectfully disagree @elizabethv because the possibilities are becoming even more as a result of the web.   The problem is that the web (i.e. the internet) is being monopolized which may present long-term challenges to its' viability.   It has been the great equalizer in many respects, though.

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/18/2016 7:37:43 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mpouraryan,

Granted immediately that the internet can and should be an equalizer on information access, it's of limited aid if people can't effectively use the information they're accessing. And pasting it in undigested (often unread) chunks is not "using" it for anything other than the exchange-for-points that the "content" mentality leads directly to.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/18/2016 3:08:27 PM
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Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
What would you deem to be an 'Effective" Use of the internet?    It is a struggle at times for my current start-up @DailyOutsider and curious to see what your thoughts are on it. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/31/2016 11:28:20 PM
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Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
mpouraryan,

I never did get around to answering this, till now anyway ... the effective use I have in mind is synthesis of new ideas, and improvement of existing ones, or in short the creation of new knowledge. The Web/net/Google etc. can support this but there has to be a mind capable of operating on ideas (rather than just transcribing them) and doing it well, and Google encourages and abets the opposite by acting sort of like a cheat line in a trivia game. So if you ask a student to, for example, trace  the idea of freedom through Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, the student nowadays will paraphrase (if you're lucky -- more often just cut and paste) the first thing s/he Googles up about Hobbes+freedom, then the first thing about Locke+freedom, then Rousseau+freedom, full stop. The student will not absorb the three different related concepts or any structure of relationship, as the assignment intends, because that doesn't result in a simple, recognizable piece of "content" to the student.

And a contemporary student who doesn't know the difference between three unrelated juxtaposed paraphrases and a single synthetic idea is, bluntly, dumber than a student of past generations who did. The hidden advantage of paper library research was that a student had to spend time reading the idea to get the gist (because it was too much to copy), copy that gist, paraphrase it not to avoid Turnitin but because that was part of the job of writing a coherent paper, and thus give him/herself multiple opportunities to understand it. Search engines and cut-and-paste have done away with all that.

 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/31/2016 11:33:12 PM
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Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
You may not believe this @JohnBarnes, but you just made one of the most credible arguments for the need and necessity for Common Core that forces students to think.  We have to underscore that always as we are witness to transformation that at times is overwhelming.

"See" You all next month :) 

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
8/1/2016 6:54:16 AM
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Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
Mpouraryan, Well, and here we all are! Actually from my time as a math tutor in my wife's tutoring business, and from working on a never-completed book on math coaching, I'm a big fan of Common Core for math.

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/31/2016 9:57:53 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@JohnBarnes - as someone who taught college courses for a few years - I can tell you this is EXACTLY what is happening and it's frightening. No one takes the time to apply the ideas and information they find anywhere and use that to create a full thought. Critical thinking is rapidly becoming a thing of the past - no one believes anything new, just whatever information they were fed from whatever blog they were able to find. People's definition of a reliable source is becoming more and more liberal. Part of me is proud, while another part of me shudders when my three-year-old is able to offer a stronger argument for a belief than my students were. Great that I am teaching my three-year-old to think critically, insane that I teach 20-year-olds that aren't capable of the same level of thought. The sad thing is, Google could be an extremely exciting wealth of knowledge to have at our fingertips - and it really is. The bad thing is that it is misused and wasted by so many. Never has knowledge been so accessible to so many, and not utilized by so few. 

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dchampagne70
dchampagne70
12/31/2016 5:00:55 PM
User Rank
Silver
The internet living up to potential
I can say that each and everyone is in charge of their addictions and have to deal with the consequences of our behaviors.  I find that I get very upset with my husband more and more.  I will be trying to talk to him about important issues and I say everything I needed and at the end when I hope to get an answer I realize he did not hear one single word I said and plus what makes it worse is that he says, " What did you say?"  Oh, come on man.

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