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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/5/2016 4:13:26 AM
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Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@batye, yup. Advanced AI is not going to stop improving. Perhaps we'll have some people looking into the ethical aspects to make sure we don't create an evil AI program, but I don't think we'll even know what kind of AI we're creating while we create it. There's no way to tell if a human baby will grow up to become a murderer, so I doubt we'll be able to figure it out for a piece of software either. 

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 1:35:11 AM
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Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
@mhhf1ve interesting point/observation it like semi- smart A.I. entering our life... one way or other...

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 1:29:54 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mindset
@dcawrey yes, I see the same patern with changes in emails and social media... interesting 

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
7/4/2016 2:12:43 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mindset
I agree with similar patterns back in time of initial email era. Whatever may be the medium it would be ok if there is no obsessive behaviour. I am often surprised to see some folks with their hourly(or even more frequent?) status updates like eatingat this place, checked into ...., driving by ,,,etc. I don't feel those kind of details are always necessary to be too publice, at least in my view.

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dcawrey
dcawrey
7/4/2016 1:55:42 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Mindset
Interesting thought here about the early days of email. 

With social media, you could draw some parallels. We're now seeing people share way too much on social media sites, similar to the early days of email. I think we're starting to see a pull back from that, but intriguing to see how people react to these new communications technologies. 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/4/2016 12:46:17 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
JohnBarnes,

While I agree that what you describe is happening in the short term, I think in the long term, there will be ever more advanced versions of "Clippy" that might be able to point out the shortcoming of poorly researched writing. So instead of just saying "I see you're writing a cover letter, can I help format it?" Clippy3.0 might be able to say "I see you're contradicting yourself in this expository report, do you think you should revise your thesis?"

or.. maybe not. 

AlphaGo Next will probably take over the world and eliminate the need for human thought anyway... 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/3/2016 10:46:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
The biggest problem with Google brain is it kills creativity
One of the smarter educators of gifted and talented kids I've known straight up called it "Google brain" -- the instant looking up, processing, and then forgetting of every fact in a student project or paper. This works all right if a student is trying to write a straight-up expository report, although the student is likely to miss any controversies in the field (since s/he won't notice that what she wrote on page 2 was contradicted on page 4).  But it's a disaster for the synthesis of original ideas because those come from comparing disparate sources plus (sometimes) laboratory or experiential evidence.  It's a disaster for creative poetry or fiction because the student is neither a fox (who knows many things; all they know is what they just looked up) nor a hedgehog (who knows one important thing; you don't know an idea is important unless you retain it and apply it to more situations). Instead, they tend to write to fit a pre-existing armature, just slotting Googled facts into a Hero's Journey or Save the Cat outline.

If big people talk about ideas, average people talk about people, and small people talk about things ... well, the internet is slowly eroding the source of ideas, and it's certainly true that already it's mostly one big device for talking about people.  It's hard not to see that as making us smaller.

Which gives a whole new ominous cast to the phrase, "internet of things."

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/3/2016 10:29:13 PM
User Rank
Platinum
The online affairs "problem"
Maybe I just have a nasty mind, but online affairs eroding families and relationships seems to me one of the most obvious consequences, and the level of it doesn't surprise me at all. Consider how much the lowly automobile changed American sex mores in less than 20 years, just by giving young people somewhere to go where older people wouldn't be watching; or the liberalization of divorce laws and access to birth control a couple generations later. There's a reason why there are more than seven billion of us, and that reason uses every opportunity it gets!

 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
7/3/2016 10:18:29 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Internet of People
Michelle, Elizabeth, Dir5288,

For questions about what the net is doing to human brains, I highly recommend Nicholas Carr's THE SHALLOWS.  Scary reading.  For amusement, after you've read it, read the Amazon 1- and 2-star reviews of it and you'll see exactly the nonthought nonprocesses he's talking about in action!

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/2/2016 6:28:29 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The internet is alive
@faryl - you make a great point, the internet can certainly be valuable as well. Though I am not positive as to the effect it has had on protesting and changing the world. Anymore it seems like all people are willing to do is a sign a virtual petition. Outside of that, actually helping seems to fall by the wayside. Signing virtual petitions have no doubt made a difference, but there are some situations that need a little more than your typed name in a box.

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