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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/2/2016 5:59:04 AM
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Apps
My healthcare providers offer an app, and I love it. Though admittedly it is not as detailed as what people are asking for. You can get appointment reminders, and chat with your physician, but not any kind of medication reminder. I know some people really struggle with remembering to take their medication. Especially if there are pills to take multiple times a day. The more we rely on our phones to help us with our day to day living, it only makes sense the more we are going to want our phones to help with. That includes all things related to healthcare.

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dcawrey
dcawrey
7/4/2016 2:23:39 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Technologies such as communications and monitoring will change the way long term care is performed. I think that's a great thing. 

The one caution I would have for this technology is security and privacy. These platforms generate a lot of data that needs to be protected – I hope many realize the importance of this. 

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 1:44:11 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@dcawrey yes, you are right as this days many Co. keep forgeting about security.... or try to put as last thing to do.... or pretending they have "Good Security"...

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 10:28:05 AM
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Re: Apps
Our healthcare system is a much bigger mess than people realize. I'm not even talking about people who are not covered by insurance. Both the patients and the doctors are kept in the dark about the insurance coding system, and, as a result, patients often get billed for services that are covered or for services that the doctor should know are not but failed to warn patients about. I have to waste so much time talking to office managers, insurance agents, and even doctors over copayments, consultation fees, and lab work that I've been billed for because of that. When my pediatrician used the old, "you're the only one" to say anythign about it, I told her, "that's because the other people probably just pay the bills without paying attention to what's supposed to be covered by insurance." Much of it has to do with the way insurance companies require different codes for preventative care that is covered 100% (within network) and for sick or diagnostic work, which can be subject to both deductible and copyayments. My pediatrician's office is not at all embarrassed to say that they don't know which codes they are supposed to feel in to have the checkup-associated blood test covered correctly. I'm thinking, "but that's your job, to know these things!"

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:17:38 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella  same mess we have in Canada... and No one willing to try fix it... sad reality....

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 11:20:45 AM
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Re: Apps
@batye it's so frustrating because everyone passes the buck. The doctor leaves things up to office manager who says she gets the orders from the doctor. And, of course, the insurance company says they're just processing according to the codes sent from the doctor. The patient has absolutely no power but is the one who gets stuck with bills that should never have been generated.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:40:30 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella yes, you are right, as no one want to take resposibility... in Canada few people almost died due to this errors...

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 11:46:18 AM
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Re: Apps
@batye That happens here, too. And I discovered how a lack of proper follow up leads to problems that do affect health directly. My daughter was due for a refill of her prescription. The doctor needed to see her blood test results. The results that were sent did not include the part that was critical to establishing the right dosage. So another request had to go in to get the full results. Then the doctor said that she would put in for a new dosage. But the mail order pharmacy said it never got it. So I had to follow up with the doctor's office, leave a message, wait for the callback, hold while the prescription went through, and then check a couple of days later to be sure it was processed. Now, my daughter won't die if she misses a day or two of this medication, but I'm sure that there are people for whom it is much more critical.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:59:50 AM
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Re: Apps
@Ariella  sad reality, technology exist to make it better but people and Co.'s wanna pass the buck around... instead of fixing the problem :(

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 12:10:21 PM
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Re: Apps
@batye exactly, all the technology only improves things if people are willing to get the data right and make the information available to those who can use it. I see no evidence of that in reality. One of the things I've also observed is that the bills for lab work can vary widely even for coverage on the same insurance program, depending on which lab does the work. That is very valuable information for patients who have to do blood tests more than once a year to get the prescriptions renewed. I was paying over $200 for the blood tests when the doctor put it rhough NSLIJ, and that is with the insurances's deduction for its contractual allowance. Another lab charged under $12 for the same tests because the insurance knocks a lot more off with that lab charges with is contract, and a third charged $25 after contractual adjustments. So a patient can literally save hundreds of dollars by being informed about these differences, but the doctor is not at all intersested in taking note and passing on such info.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 12:41:06 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella it like consumers have no longer any voice or power... it very bad... how I see it... we need to change it :) or hope for a change...

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DHagar
DHagar
7/5/2016 8:24:26 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella, those are great points.  One of the key problems is that the existing data serves the payer, then the providers; it is not designed for the patient/consumer. 

What is needed is consumer-directed information that provides meaningful information on choices, transparency on cost, and information to better manage their health.

As Mike points out, we are not fully engaged with the available data and the system needs more consumer focus to truly develop telemedicine and improve the access and quality of health care.

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 8:28:23 PM
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Re: Apps
<One of the key problems is that the existing data serves the payer, then the providers; it is not designed for the patient/consumer. 

What is needed is consumer-directed information that provides meaningful information on choices, transparency on cost, and information to better manage their health.>

@DHagar Exactly so, but I think that would have to be done by a third party that would have to monetize the info through subscriptions or maybe ads. The insurance companies certainly don't want to do it because they benefit from people's confusion. The doctors don't want to do it b/c they feel stretched enough just filling out their required paperwork. So only someone who is really a patient advocate without any leanings for the professionals would be able to pull that off. 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/5/2016 8:37:50 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella, good points.  You are correct.


Those in position to represent the consumer's "health" interests are all the new players (including technology - Apple, etc.) that are getting on board with technology, data sharing, apps, data storage for Individual Health Records.  They are paid not by providers or payers, but by the value of the consumer and the value-added health services they are delivering.  Note:  A secondary market is the ability to provide the payers/providers with additional aggregated customer information (ie population health) that can add new insights on risk management.

Stay tuned - the new markets are developing!

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/5/2016 10:24:27 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
> "Stay tuned - the new markets are developing!"

An interesting site called CrowdMed.com is a fascinating example of how "new markets" might open up the medical health care industry. The site collects medical records and a team of doctors/nurses/citizen scientists/etc... try to crowdsource a second opinion of your health problems. 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/5/2016 11:02:55 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve - great example.  Yes, I think there will be a better business model that will serve the markets - as opposed to the providers/payers.  And I could not agree more, the EHR's that exist are so single focused as to be almost worthless - this is why Meaningful Use and support for EHR's are not moving forward!

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/6/2016 3:33:00 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Part of the problem for EHRs is that there are so many legal privacy requirements that no software companies are willing to invest in making a non-proprietary system that they can't lock Drs into using. And no doctor office wants to touch EHR software that doesn't make their legal liabilities clear and minimal.

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Michelle
Michelle
7/6/2016 1:42:14 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
That is an excellent point. The path to actual transferrable records is long and winding. 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/6/2016 2:57:00 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Michelle, indeed!  And the records get lost along the way.  That goes to the issue of interoperability - of which does not exist.  So it is a bridge to nowhere.

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 3:12:17 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@DHagar I would say yes, but it depends the way technology develops or if it will grow...

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DHagar
DHagar
7/7/2016 1:31:06 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@batye, I agree if your meaning of technology includes the data management, the stakeholders, and the industry itself.  I believe the technology is already there.  Here in the US the fragmented healthcare system has no network design and you have multiple stakeholders launching their own solutions and then there is a disconnect between one system and another.  There is no overarching network, so the vendors have built systems that meet "individual" provider interests and needs.

What it needs, and there are those in the industry advancing this, are data standards that can enable those different systems to relate to one another, stakeholders that recognize the importance of responsibly sharing that information, and an industry that treats the data as part of "care".

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 1:35:39 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@DHagar how I see it we need to get back to basics... where care does meant care... not a lip service... how it is this days... I do hope for a better change - aren't we all...

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DHagar
DHagar
7/7/2016 1:39:40 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@batye, there you go - I fully agree - that needs to be the focus.  We have neglected the core of healthcare - which is the delivery of care.  That's a great place to start!

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vnewman
vnewman
7/6/2016 3:23:48 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
I have a friend who sells this type of software to doctors and hospitals etc.  One of the issues he encounters is mere lack of interest by the administration and doctors themselves. It creates a ton of work for them when they are already drowning in paperwork and administrative tasks already. As Peter Gibbons said in Office Space: "It's a problem of motivation." 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/6/2016 4:02:57 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Software is not always the answer for making things seem more efficient-- esp if the end users are doctors. I know at least one doctor I've met said he was thinking about retiring because he just didn't want to deal with entering all his notes into a computer instead of whatever he's been doing for decades.

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 3:18:07 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve yes I see the same problems some of the doctors love technology and use it... some wanna stay old school.. it life... or human nature...

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DHagar
DHagar
7/7/2016 1:37:54 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve, "Software is not always the answer for making things seem more efficient-- esp if the end users are doctors."

I believe that is the biggest barrier to an effective system.  The EHR's have not been developed for the Doctor or the patient.  Until you build a better system that serves both, I do not believe you will have a true system; you will continue to have gaps, segmented data silos, and frustrated doctors and patients.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:33:48 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
What, then, can be done to change this perception?   In my experience, all leading EHR systems have been done with the direct input (and all have had Chief Medical Officers).  Have you had any direct experience otherwise?  Just wondering...

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DHagar
DHagar
7/18/2016 4:17:46 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, yes.  I have worked with Kaiser, Epic, major vendors, and numerous hospital and physician groups, as well as health plans with 1 million plus members.  They all agree that the end of one system does not connect with the next; so you have duplicate and redundant systems.  The goals are well intended, but the systems have been built separately with different vendor systems - most often without the input of physicians and providers.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/18/2016 4:43:37 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Based on your "firing line" perspective, then, how can we work to "Transform" this?   Clearly what is hear is not working--right?  

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DHagar
DHagar
7/18/2016 7:47:28 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, to a degree that is correct, what is in place is not working well enough to solving the problems for doctors in deliveriing care to their patients.  It truly does digitize and submit the claims process, not the care process.

I believe there are positive developments, as this article points out, with a platform for healthcare apps, targeted to the patient.  We need patient-centric systems.  Then the healthcare industry's leadership (ie HIMSS) in extended standards for data (like exists with HL7) would go a long way to gaining industry support.  Then the government identifying standardized claims data (since they represent 50% of the market), would provide data foundations where the disparate systems could connect.

There is hope.  Like anything else, it will require leadership.

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 3:20:16 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@Michelle I do hope same things happens in Canada... as for now my family MD could say - I see on my PC you did go to ER, but I do not know or could not read what treatment  Rx did you receive...  

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DHagar
DHagar
7/6/2016 2:55:47 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve - you outline the issues well!  Check out CentriHealth.com - they are one of the national companies who understand the issue and are working on IHR's as well as EHR's.  The people that truly understand are NOT satisfied.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/6/2016 8:44:13 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
I think it's telling that Google tried to create an Individual Health Record (IHR) with Google Health -- but then shut it down shortly after it launched.

https://techcrunch.com/2011/06/26/why-google-really-failed-money/

It's difficult to get healthcare providers AND patients to move to a standardized platform because the incentives are all over the map. Insurers and patients and doctors and hospitals.. all have different motivations and incentives for using a tech platform to store and communicate health data. So I think I'm not that optimistic about any PHR/IHR/EHR system that isn't backed by a coalition of insurance agencies, govt agencies and hospitals....

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 3:16:17 AM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve thanks for the link interesting to know... in Canada it was a big hype with eHealth but after - http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ehealth-scandal-a-1b-waste-auditor-1.808640... it sad reality....

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/7/2016 1:48:49 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Canada isn't alone is wasting billions on healthcare programs. It's especially sad to see it wasted in healthcare when that money could have done so much more to help patients.

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batye
batye
7/7/2016 2:34:22 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve for me it sad as a taxpayer I have to be finding Canadian gov stupidity... and get No service at the end...

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:27:35 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Technology and transformation is a good thing--but to what end?   How do we need to make sure that the interests of all are served in the end--it appears from what @batye is noting is that in Canada, such is not as prevalent as it seems--Maybe we're away and are not in the thick of it.    Please clarify on this "notion of Stupidibity" and whether you have run across any initiative to overcome it--It seems as if the new Prime Minister is taking some solid steps? 

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batye
batye
7/17/2016 9:49:55 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mpouraryan  our Can gov. just spend money on dead projects hiring relatives... it like free for all... where taxpayers end up holding empty hat... at the end... http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/examining-ehealth-ontario-1.777661

even local gov. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Computer_Leasing_Inquiry

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/inquiry-judge-people-disgraced-themselves-in-toronto-scandal-1.548496 - everyone get slap on the wrist...

 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 10:22:01 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Thanks for the guidance @batye.    I would not, however, put much stock in what is available on wikipedia.     Would you rather be in the US and be at the mercy of insurance companies?  That's the key question.

 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:32:32 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
My limited understanding of Canadian Healthcare is that as a percentage of cost, it is a lot more ahead of the curve than the United States.     

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DHagar
DHagar
7/7/2016 1:21:21 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve, understand your points and they are good ones.  That's right, I have already forgotten about GoogleApps.

I believe you have the right focal point - with a centralized data exchange capability (ie Standards) like with Government payor (ie Medicare), etc.  The one common denominator there is payment - and we now have coding standards - so they can build claims data first and then core clinical data exchange.  The other key point is to allow the multiple providers, as you point out, the opportunity to "view" their patient data with their own preferences, but have a core taxonomy that links with key clinical data. 

It will take time, but it can get there!

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/7/2016 1:53:05 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Yes, when there are more standardized systems in place, maybe EHRs will have fewer barriers to overcome. It's too optimistic to think that some kind of open source EHR platform might emerge (instead of proprietary one).

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DHagar
DHagar
7/7/2016 2:29:27 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve, agreed, EHR platforms most likely will never happen, given the multiple failures of RHIO's.  That's why I believe a government data standard for claims will enable multiple proprietary systems to transfer key data.  (Note:  The industry has a pretty successful history with HL7, so it should not be too much of a stretch, particularly when tied to payments, to establish some key additional data standards.)

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:29:00 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
As I have been assessing everyone's discourse, it seems to me that one of "Obamacare"'s goals was to streamline--but the notion of "never going to happen" is a rather harsh view--the transformation to digitization is on whether we like or not.

 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/18/2016 4:11:38 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, the assessment of interoperability is what I am referring to.  Actually, the digitization of EHR's was started even before President Obama and was signed into law by previous President Bush - so it is not a part of Obamacare.

The requirement to digitize and submit billing and claims to CMS is one issue, but the points mhhf1ve is making, that I agree with, is that the way in which different providers and vendors have digitized has not been built around a standard of data interoperability, so the ability to share that information among providers is lacking.

As I was stating, the government could work with HIMSS and HL7, as an example, and serve an important role in establishing standards, which would assist providers and vendors in developing interoperability.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/18/2016 4:42:42 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Why, in you view, this standardization being stymied as it has been?  The whole idea behind Obamacare was to accelerate digitization and a lot of new startups have arisen to help with this, right?

 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/18/2016 7:42:48 PM
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Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, good assessment.  Yes, the vendors jumped in with their own proprietary solutions - selling their solutions to the providers, when they saw the dollars and the markets.  Yes, startups jumped in as well, but after having "sold" everyone on their version of how the patient records should be digitized, each system is different.  The vendors were focused on the transition process from paper records to digital records and connecting the dots within each provider's system.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/19/2016 2:21:34 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
What is then clear is that this who figure out how to 'bridge the gap", harness the data will be able to overcome and truly be the "transformational agents"--the question is who? 

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DHagar
DHagar
7/19/2016 2:45:17 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, I don't think the answer will be a single who, or you will end up with one version versus another again.  The industry needs a standard, from the industry associations, the government, and/or the market power of the customers wanting transferable information with their healthcare apps - or "all of the above"!

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/19/2016 2:49:25 PM
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Re: Apps
The question, then, is this:  who is out there in your view that helps drives say the "linux" or "Java" that has helped to standardize and transform our tech world as we know it?   

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DHagar
DHagar
7/19/2016 3:34:09 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, only my opinion mind you - that is where multiple vendors created a platform for open standards and interoperability that served industry and was adopted by industry itself.

That is also the case where vendors were responding to a somewhat developed IT market.  Healthcare is not just playing to a connecting point for developed technologies, many providers are still adopting to the entire concept of digitilization.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/19/2016 4:57:37 PM
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Re: Apps
Understood--the question is then who will be left standing once this shakedown in effect occurs?    It is clear that the ordinary user (us) seems to be left out in the process and the human element continues to be discounted consistently.    

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DHagar
DHagar
7/19/2016 5:41:50 PM
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Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, no, actually I respectfully disagree.  If we are dealing with healthcare, that is where there is great opportunity for the consumer (through healthcare apps - as this blog reveals) to be the true customer and the markets to form around the new connections with the consumer.  That may actually drive a positive standard to connect with the customer.

There is hope yet.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/19/2016 6:22:07 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
On this, we will agree to disagree because when we're faced with increased premium costs, increased overall healthcare costs, things have to change and so far I see none....

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DHagar
DHagar
7/19/2016 6:37:44 PM
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Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, points noted, and we will see if change is possible and comes about.  In the mean time, the demand for connected healthcare apps is a positive sign.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/19/2016 6:39:22 PM
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Re: Apps
We have to pursue change--that's our challenge.   We can and need to overcome.   

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DHagar
DHagar
7/19/2016 6:41:18 PM
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Re: Apps
@mpouraryan, you get my vote!

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:31:05 PM
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Re: Apps
Opensource is not a question of if, but when as underscored by this interesting resource I ran across:  http://openehr.org/

 

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:34:26 PM
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Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve interesting to know thanks for sharing this info... I think this way of the future...

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Ariella
Ariella
7/6/2016 11:23:13 AM
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Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve thanks for that link, I'll have to check it out. Yes, X-Rays don't always transfer over even when they're regular ones from a hospital to an affiliated doctor. We've had to manually bring both discs and physical X-Rays from one office to another ourselves because of that.

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Ariella
Ariella
7/6/2016 11:23:13 AM
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Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve thanks for that link, I'll have to check it out. Yes, X-Rays don't always transfer over even when they're regular ones from a hospital to an affiliated doctor. We've had to manually bring both discs and physical X-Rays from one office to another ourselves because of that.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/6/2016 12:39:12 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Transferring medical files is oddly difficult when huge non-medical files (eg pirated 4K movies, VR games) are regularly transferred between teenagers. It doesn't seem like it should be so hard to communicate medical info. A doctor friend of mine, tho, was telling me how hard it was for him to get his colleagues to use a snapchat-like app for discussing patients conditions within the same hospital.

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Ariella
Ariella
7/6/2016 12:55:55 PM
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Re: Apps
@mhhf1ve at my pediatrician's office, the story was that no one's system's talks to the other. But even within connected systems, there are roadblocks like the doctor who doesn't update his log in credentials, etc.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/6/2016 2:44:11 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
Heh. You'd think with the notorious bad handwriting that doctors have.. That they'd be more open to trying a text-based app for recording notes. But then I guess handwriting vs typing/texting is still a hurdle for some folks. And voice transcription for medicine exists but it's a hassle and an expense.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
7/17/2016 3:37:03 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
The interent being the great equalizer can help to transform it--no question.    The technology is already there--it was interesting when I ran across this:

https://www.drugs.com/apps/

There is no question that a lot of education is needed.     How the apprehension is critical to be overcome is the challenge ultimately.

 

 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/5/2016 10:02:15 PM
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Platinum
Re: Apps
> "it's so frustrating because everyone passes the buck."

Exactly this. Every part of healthcare has become so compartmentalized that one doctor will hand off part of a treatment to another doctor specialist and then to another.. and none of those doctors ever talk among each other to compare notes (esp if they aren't part of the same dr networks). And the bills just pile up and the prescriptions accumulate.. it's a bit crazy. I mean, I understand that no single human being can learn every specialty.. but a *little* more holistic treatment would be nice to see someday..... 

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 10:13:24 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Apps
<and none of those doctors ever talk among each other to compare notes (esp if they aren't part of the same dr networks)>

@mhhf1ve I've encountered that, too. The pediatrician never got updated info. on my daughter's prescription even though the specialist who prescribes it was referred by that practice. Also I could not even get the hospital to send my son's record to a primary care doctor. They claimed they were only allowed to send the records to the patient and charged for it, too (not a huge amount, but still). 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
7/5/2016 10:20:38 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
Standardized medical records have been a holy grail for decades now... and I still don't see EHR systems that make sense. Every different kind of doctor has a different system and the file formats are all incompatible and different. Even my kid's dentist couldn't share dental x-rays with another dentist because the image files were proprietary to the X-ray scanner that the 1st dentist used... You'd think image files, like common dental X-rays, would be a standard file format... 

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 1:17:04 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
dcawrey, I am concerned about security as well.

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freehe
freehe
7/31/2016 1:19:08 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Healthcare apps
One reason the healthcare industry is not embrassing healthcare apps as quickly as other industries is because they provide real-time critical services and cannot risk the time needed to convert to another system, risk any downtime or time needed to train employees on new systems because they are overworked and understaffed.

They know they need the apps but can't find the time to implement them.

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clrmoney
clrmoney
7/2/2016 12:15:35 PM
User Rank
Platinum
healthcare apps
I'm not surprised that emergency alerts were the tops in rank because there will always be emergencies meaning people in need of help so I think that this is gtreat that they have these apps.

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batye
batye
7/4/2016 3:21:15 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: healthcare apps
@clrmoney yes, as this app's could save lives plus provide right and correct info in need in case of the emergency ...

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elizabethv
elizabethv
7/31/2016 9:42:15 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: healthcare apps
@clrmoney - They could be really useful for caregivers, especially if the patient or family member has a way to send the alert in a manner that could just be the push of a button. This would be even signficantly easier than calling 911, which involes the answering of a number of questions that might be difficult. If the caregiver receives an alert that tells them specifically who is in need of the help, they don't need to know where the address is, they likely already know, and can work on getting and giving the help needed. 

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