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DHagar
DHagar
7/5/2016 8:24:26 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella, those are great points.  One of the key problems is that the existing data serves the payer, then the providers; it is not designed for the patient/consumer. 

What is needed is consumer-directed information that provides meaningful information on choices, transparency on cost, and information to better manage their health.

As Mike points out, we are not fully engaged with the available data and the system needs more consumer focus to truly develop telemedicine and improve the access and quality of health care.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 12:41:06 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella it like consumers have no longer any voice or power... it very bad... how I see it... we need to change it :) or hope for a change...

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 12:10:21 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: Apps
@batye exactly, all the technology only improves things if people are willing to get the data right and make the information available to those who can use it. I see no evidence of that in reality. One of the things I've also observed is that the bills for lab work can vary widely even for coverage on the same insurance program, depending on which lab does the work. That is very valuable information for patients who have to do blood tests more than once a year to get the prescriptions renewed. I was paying over $200 for the blood tests when the doctor put it rhough NSLIJ, and that is with the insurances's deduction for its contractual allowance. Another lab charged under $12 for the same tests because the insurance knocks a lot more off with that lab charges with is contract, and a third charged $25 after contractual adjustments. So a patient can literally save hundreds of dollars by being informed about these differences, but the doctor is not at all intersested in taking note and passing on such info.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:59:50 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella  sad reality, technology exist to make it better but people and Co.'s wanna pass the buck around... instead of fixing the problem :(

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 11:46:18 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Apps
@batye That happens here, too. And I discovered how a lack of proper follow up leads to problems that do affect health directly. My daughter was due for a refill of her prescription. The doctor needed to see her blood test results. The results that were sent did not include the part that was critical to establishing the right dosage. So another request had to go in to get the full results. Then the doctor said that she would put in for a new dosage. But the mail order pharmacy said it never got it. So I had to follow up with the doctor's office, leave a message, wait for the callback, hold while the prescription went through, and then check a couple of days later to be sure it was processed. Now, my daughter won't die if she misses a day or two of this medication, but I'm sure that there are people for whom it is much more critical.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:40:30 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella yes, you are right, as no one want to take resposibility... in Canada few people almost died due to this errors...

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 11:20:45 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Apps
@batye it's so frustrating because everyone passes the buck. The doctor leaves things up to office manager who says she gets the orders from the doctor. And, of course, the insurance company says they're just processing according to the codes sent from the doctor. The patient has absolutely no power but is the one who gets stuck with bills that should never have been generated.

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 11:17:38 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
@Ariella  same mess we have in Canada... and No one willing to try fix it... sad reality....

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Ariella
Ariella
7/5/2016 10:28:05 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: Apps
Our healthcare system is a much bigger mess than people realize. I'm not even talking about people who are not covered by insurance. Both the patients and the doctors are kept in the dark about the insurance coding system, and, as a result, patients often get billed for services that are covered or for services that the doctor should know are not but failed to warn patients about. I have to waste so much time talking to office managers, insurance agents, and even doctors over copayments, consultation fees, and lab work that I've been billed for because of that. When my pediatrician used the old, "you're the only one" to say anythign about it, I told her, "that's because the other people probably just pay the bills without paying attention to what's supposed to be covered by insurance." Much of it has to do with the way insurance companies require different codes for preventative care that is covered 100% (within network) and for sick or diagnostic work, which can be subject to both deductible and copyayments. My pediatrician's office is not at all embarrassed to say that they don't know which codes they are supposed to feel in to have the checkup-associated blood test covered correctly. I'm thinking, "but that's your job, to know these things!"

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batye
batye
7/5/2016 1:44:11 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Apps
@dcawrey yes, you are right as this days many Co. keep forgeting about security.... or try to put as last thing to do.... or pretending they have "Good Security"...

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