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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
9/29/2016 3:01:08 PM
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Platinum
Re: "Infobesity"
Joe, I think there's been an underwhelming amount of coverage of the Yahoo breach details... did the breach include plaintext passwords? how much info has been compromised? Yahoo hasn't even contacted its users about the details... and only recently reached out to users to change their passwords.... 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
9/29/2016 10:17:11 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Infobesity
What you've underscored is what I have been noting all along throughout the discourse this month--we have to be human.  Part of being human is to challenge ourselves--and to your point, if we take care of the brain, it will take care of itself in the end.

Onward to the 4th quarter w/all its' pitfalls & possibilities

 

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freehe
freehe
9/29/2016 10:04:42 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Infobesity
"infobesity." The cure for infobesity is using digital tools correctly, which includes taking breaks by setting down or walking away from those devices.

This is a huge problem. Viewers are viewing content but the content does not benefit the viewer in any way, it is just for entertainment. Doing the same thing over and over again without challenging the brain is the quickest way to develop alzheimer's later in life.

Mind numbing viewing is a real problem especially among those 16-35.

Infobesity has several disadvantages:
  1. Decreases vision and perception
  2. Reduces the ability to focus on other content
  3. Results in dry eyes
  4. Decrease human interaction and socializing
  5. Develops people who lack social skills

and many more consequences.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
9/28/2016 11:47:19 AM
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Author
Re: "Infobesity"
@mhh: Ditto, too, for when you have only one or two datasets related to a particular individual -- but you have the same one or two datasets for every other individual as well.

Case in point: The Adobe breach, where people's hashed passwords and plaintext password hints were compromised -- allowing for deconstruction and transposition.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
9/28/2016 11:42:05 AM
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Author
Re: "Infobesity"
@mhh: I did not know that.  In the case of Germany, though, it's strictly a privacy thing -- and how clicking the Like button automatically passes along personal information.

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
9/16/2016 1:11:46 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: "Infobesity"
> "At least one German state has outright "banned" Facebook's Like button widget -- and urged its denizens to keep from clicking on webpage Like buttons."

The different policies and cultures for handling privacy (among other things) varies wildly around the world... and it actually reminds me that I've never figured out how the Facebook "like" icon is displayed globally. Because in some countries, isn't the "thumbs up" signal a bit offensive? I assume Facebook must use some other icon in "West Africa, Iran, and Greece"..? 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thumbs_signal

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
9/16/2016 12:53:37 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: "Infobesity"
> "@mhh: I'm not so sure about the idea of introducing random noise (do you have a link or other source on how this is being done?)..."

There's a subset of the field of cryptography that studies how to maximize statistically relevant information while minimizing the chances of identifying the individual records in a collected database. Academic surveys asking interviewees about very sensitive/personal topics (or about illegal activities, where the participants wouldn't want to admit to committing a crime) have used a fairly simple "flip a coin before answering the question" process (described here: https://research.googleblog.com/2014/10/learning-statistics-with-privacy-aided.html -- a couple years ago). More recently, companies like Apple are trying to come up with more advanced ways to store personal data without compromising people's privacy. I'm not a mathematician, but it seems like it boils down to making the de-anonymizing process more uncertain, so that you can only say with some (low) probability whether or not the individual records you're trying to uncover are accurate.

Obviously, though, in reality, there may be other datasets that aren't governed by these cryptography efforts that could completely wipe out the effectiveness (if it truly even exists). That is, Apple could be encrypting people's data, so that the odds are low that any of its collected info can be directly tied to particular users, but then a user's wireless carrier might just collect all the metadata for every action a user takes and allow anyone to pinpoint an individual's activity and personal info, regardless of how much random noise is injected to try to throw off prying eyes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_privacy

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vnewman
vnewman
9/13/2016 4:02:43 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: "Infobesity"
I think the problem with that model is people tend to binge watch an entire series over a few days then a few things happen: they get sick of it, lose interest by the time the installment comes around, or just plain forget about it.  

At least with broadcast TV you get your weekly fix for awhile and then it becomes a habit - and we all know habits are hard to break.  

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
9/13/2016 3:03:05 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: "Infobesity"
That may well be the true "value add"--amazing how the symbiotic relationship somehow transcends.     And oh, on a side note, Mr. Bezos has a new rocket!!

:)



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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
9/13/2016 5:24:41 AM
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Author
Re: "Infobesity"
@mp: That's a matter of both corporate practices and cultural attitudes.

In the EU, the prevailing attitude is a highly paternalistic and protective one.  At least one German state has outright "banned" Facebook's Like button widget -- and urged its denizens to keep from clicking on webpage Like buttons.

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