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dlr5288
dlr5288
9/30/2016 12:27:35 PM
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Platinum
Re: a la carte
I agree!

I do think they are focusing more on quantity and have been for a while, but if the things coming out have little quality then what's the point?

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elizabethv
elizabethv
9/29/2016 10:29:27 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: a la carte
@dcawrey - I think they will be okay if they find a general level of quality that appeals to most audiences. So long as the typical viewer is satisfied, I can't see them being unsuccessful with such an appealing business model. 

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dcawrey
dcawrey
9/27/2016 6:11:30 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: a la carte
I think we're going to see a lot more examples of this. The pay TV market has been focused on providing quantity over quality. It's that quality that is important; the problem is figuring out what each view thinks that level of quality is. 

That's the big challenge. 

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Adi
Adi
9/26/2016 4:31:57 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: a la carte
@mike - yes, as "afwriter points out, there are no numbers yet. We'll have a better sense once there are tangible figures to see. Should also say that the Netherlands is a comparatively small market compared to the states, so changing the game here takes less than it would stateside. 

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Adi
Adi
9/26/2016 4:29:03 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: TMobile OTT Game Changer
@freehe I think you have neatly summarized the key complaints a lot of customers have with pay-TV in the US today. Part of the challenge in the US is that it is the largest and most lucrative TV market in the world. Its also very competitive which you think would favor the consumer, and to be fair, it does in a number of ways. But that also means that it funds a lot of program development for the major media companies - it's seen as the primary revenue driver. So they are less willing to be flexible for a US pay-TV provider trying to put together an a la carte package than a foriegn one. I remember episodes of NYPD Blue - a show that cost $3-5 million per episode to produce in those days - selling to Indian channels for $5,000 per episode. That was the best they could do, and they accepted it. But you can bet ABC paid a lot more!

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elizabethv
elizabethv
9/26/2016 1:18:11 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: TMobile OTT Game Changer
@ freehe - I think you're exactly right. If companies over here would work towards creating services that would allow customers to pick and choose the channels they wanted access too, they would find themselves the most popular service around. I have to wonder if they think it isn't a feasible business model, and that's why it hasn't been accomplished in the US as of yet. I'm sure they like having their info-mercial channels, because let's be honest, they are probably a big money maker. But who is legitmately going to pay just to have access to those channels? 

 

The other aspect I think you are right on with is the contracts. People don't want to be forced to stay with a company any longer than they have to. I know I'm locked into one with my alarm company for the next like 5 years and I can't wait for it to end.....

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freehe
freehe
9/25/2016 2:52:06 PM
User Rank
Platinum
TMobile OTT Game Changer
TMobile gets it. They figured out what was needed, how to do it and how to keep customers happy.

"Knippr is offered at the same price to T-Mobile subscribers and non-subscribers".

If all telco companies in the U.S. offered this feature they would have to turn away customers.

Knippr is an a la carte package. If all telco offered a la carte packages that customers wanted they would have to turn away customers.

"We find most consumers use about 15 channels, but have to subscribe to 70 [with traditional TV services]," said Van Lammeren. "

This sounds like most cable companies.

Another important driver is the lack of a contract.

Companies that offer services without a contract have slowly caught on in the U.S. but more companies need to adopt this feature. Customers want it. Only time will tell how U.S. companies change their business models.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
9/25/2016 10:36:11 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Most people's dream
It all comes down to the power of choice--and you noted how you wanted to retain that power as you lamented how Netflix is trying to take away that choice.    if the power of choice is retained, then there is something to be said about it all.   That's at the heart of it.

 

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elizabethv
elizabethv
9/25/2016 12:59:51 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Most people's dream
@mpouraryan - The closest thing to this model in the states - and maybe I'm wrong - is Sling TV, which has its limitations in not being completely a pick and choose. I would say if they offered a great price, with possible additional benefits or add-ons - maybe a discount on their phone service? they could definitely make a go of it. I think the a la carte idea would be a huge one, really. 

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
9/24/2016 5:07:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sign Me Up
Can this in fact not be a game-changer?  T-Mobile has already been able to force a lot of changes already--right?   

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