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DHagar
DHagar
4/27/2017 7:07:44 PM
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Re: IDC Big Data Trends
@JohnBarnes, well excellent anaysis!  It will force us to "think" even about our thinking!  (A natural new development direction for the people just learning how to learn, and a conscious "rethinking" for those of us who learned another method first.

This confirms the importance of education and knowledge - which thankfully still relies on our speciies - that is the advantage we hold!

Thanks for sharing these great thoughts!

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/26/2017 9:39:12 PM
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Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
DHagar,

We both get to agree with each other some more, and see different emphases. It's becoming more and more apparent that human intelligence is made up of extensive "subroutines" -- habits and structures of thought that we can use without having to consciously operate them (very much the way we can read for hours without directly thinking about recalling what sounds the letters represent or reminding ourselves to read from left to right, or understand a cartoon without reminding ourselves that the lines represent stylized shapes abstracted from boundaries between hues, saturations, or values).

The thing that some of that great software does is installs modules so that we don't think about letters (as we tended to do with typewriters) but about sentences; we don't think about numbers when we're setting up a spreadsheet as much as we think about the relations and structures of variables, i.e. generally and algebraically instead of particularly and arithmetically. And again, where most people up to now have tended to think of graphs either like an art director (i.e. what idea does this sell?) or like an engineer (i.e. how does the function behave?), Tableau drives people toward thinking like a statistical graph theorist, i.e. how can the psychologically most prominent features be aligned with the most mathematically salient issues? 

Difficult as it is for me to admit, it's at least one area in which my generally discouraging species seems to be getting a bit smarter.

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DHagar
DHagar
4/26/2017 6:41:23 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
@JohnBarnes, excellent analysis, as always!  Which takes us back to the growing importace of knowledge of theories to effectively navigate the technology world.  That continues to link with and gain value through "human intelligence" - the key in my view - in knowing and applying the theories and problem-solving concepts.

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Itsmeshawn22
Itsmeshawn22
4/25/2017 12:01:32 PM
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Platinum
Big Data Throwdown: Top 10 Trends
This is very interesting but the graph explains it all. Very well understanding but with the big data throwdown is very misundertood sometimes and can be very tricky but this is a good point of the article and everybody should read it so they can understand. I agree with this. 

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/24/2017 8:04:26 PM
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Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
DHagar,

I was actually thinking of the way in which Tableau is based on statistical graph theory as opposed to either what some graphic designer from the art side thought looked cool (e.g. Periscope) or what some engineer needed to make the same graphs he'd been making since sophomore Engineering Stats class (e.g. DataDesk), or worse yet some scrambled unholy non-fusion congeries of both  (I'm looking at you pointedly, Microsoft Excel charts).  Tableau is actually easy to understand if you've got your statistical graph theory straight, and many of the terms on your screen will be from that new-ish discipline, but it will barely cooperate at all if you're trying to do something bogus.

Much the same way that word processors made writers think about sentence and paragraph mechanics more (because they took away the straitjacket of having to work linearly while privileging what you'd already done) and spreadsheets made people think about "what in general do I want to do?" instead of bogging down in "next, do I divide?"

The most intellectually innovative software has done that repeatedly (I'm thinking of things like BASIC, LISP, Photoshop): given people a capability they can only access by developing their own capacities correctly. I think Tableau is the latest in that honorable line.

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DHagar
DHagar
4/24/2017 6:36:41 PM
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Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
@JohnBarnes, so true!  It does test our recall and how well we developed and learned the basics before moving on.  So much today is digested for us, this takes us back to the basics.

But it is also an endorsement for learning the basic principles and the tools from which computing, and programs operate.  Even moving forward with AI will be based on basic theories for algorithms, etc.

This goes to show we could develop a basic digital literacy and better prepare people to get value - as opposed to treating each program with operational instructions?

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/23/2017 10:16:15 PM
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Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
DHagar,

A late but sincere second on your pointing out what great stuff is coming out of Tableau.  I've just recently started learning to use it and I'm somewhat reminded of what it was like to use a spreadsheet or a word processor for the first time, when those were new -- i.e. simultaneously amazed at the power and baffled by having to relearn your most fundamental ideas of the world.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
4/23/2017 10:13:33 PM
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Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
DCawrey,

Big data/data science are I think in one of those odd historic moments that happen now and then in scientific fields (and sometimes others) in which the frontier or territory between established disciplines used to be somewhere quiet with very little going on (indeed that was often how the boundary ended up there), but has become an active "mid ocean ridge" with huge amounts of new ideas growing and developing. That's what happened when computation and number theory,  electrical engineering, and quantum physics (specifically transistors) all began to intersect to create computer science; further back it was what happened when the chemists and the physicists discovered that the valence and the electrons they had been trying to understand were two names for the same thing; more recently the whole school of math now known as chaos theory arose at the intersection of at least a dozen traditional sciences and social sciences.

At the moment, most of the practitioners are still thinking in terms of the problems from their home territory, but that's only for a moment. In 15 years you'll have people who learn data science first, and then decide what field to go into with it (just as many engineers don't work in the fields they train for; it's important for them to be engineers and understand engineering, but many times the fundamental skill set is what matters).

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DHagar
DHagar
4/20/2017 7:30:02 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
@mpouraryan, that's the spirit! 

And don't forget - there is always the next election - what is changed now can be changed further in the future!

I also think companies will be mindful of these swings and leverage their investments to not invest too heavily in one particular philosophy.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
4/20/2017 12:13:45 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: IDC Big Data Trends
I remain hopeful notwithstanding the continued onslaught by the current FCC crew in Washington--on which today's NY Times had a rather troubling report on.

 

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