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dlr5288
dlr5288
8/30/2016 1:21:46 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No suprise
I had no idea! But good to know. I've had Comcast for 5ish years now and really never had a problem with customer service.

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ms.akkineni
ms.akkineni
8/19/2016 11:18:40 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No suprise
@Joe:

Very true. As all technology runs behind the scenes, all that matters is how seemlessly customers gets to see the value behind in terms of services / content that they get.

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Ariella
Ariella
8/5/2016 1:27:54 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: No suprise
@vnewman thanks for sharing that. These kinds of protection plans always seem to have exclusions that protect the company for shelling out real money to cusotmers. It reminds me of my experience with the furniture warranty I purchased.

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vnewman
vnewman
8/5/2016 1:20:50 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No suprise
@dlr5288 - I think Comcast has made some progress overall but continues to tank in the customer service realm.  For seven years in a row Comcast ranked at the bottom of 24/7 Wall St.'s annual customer satisfaction poll.

Now they are being sued: This week Washington state filed a $100 million lawsuit against Comcast, accusing the company of 1.8 million violations of the the state's Consumer Protection Act.  The gist is their $4.99-per-month "Service Protection Plan," which is supposed to cover in-wall wiring, but excludes interior wall wiring that requires wall fishing?

Huh?  Stay away from OTT Comcast until you get this mess sorted out.

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vnewman
vnewman
8/5/2016 1:01:42 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No suprise
@Joe - I don't know Joe, their stock says otherwise!

There's a story behind your comment - do tell: what happened to turn you off of them?

And of course, it's all relative.  Right now, they are doing ,*most* things marginally better than most others, but better is still better.

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JohnBarnes
JohnBarnes
8/5/2016 8:20:03 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No suprise
Joe, as a stray idea off your post: I wonder if eventually content itself will work like the old imitation cycle in publishing used to work: there were actually only M ready and N potential buyers for a given flavor of book (say, vampire westerns). If there had never been such a book, or hadn't been one in a long while, the first one to come out got almost all M buyers, and became a cult bestseller; that got media attention, recruiting many of the N, which looked like explosive growth. So every other publisher would try to clone that first book, and now Library Journal and Publisher's Weekly would be screaming TREND, and booksellers would order and display more, and eventually the whole N would be recruited into buying -- and now "vampire westerns" looked like a sure thing forever.

Until, of course, the publishers desperately overbought, subdividing the N so much that no one book or writer made much money (except, perhaps, the few that started the trend). Then it would be declared over, done with, dead, and contracts would be cancelled and vampire westerns would go away for a generation ...

This may be possible not just for one genre of books but for content itself. There are only so many watchers. They can or will only watch so much. As more OTT providers repack more of the same stuff, at some point, nobody will make much money and shakeout will get serious.


Could content itself eventually be "over"?

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
8/4/2016 6:16:26 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No suprise
Amazon vs Comcast's customer support.. 

My experience has been that Amazon's customer support is far better than any ISP I've dealt with before. If only Amazon sold broadband connections.... maybe it will someday.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
8/1/2016 7:33:01 AM
User Rank
Author
Re: No suprise
@ms.a: Indeed, customers don't care about the specific technology.  They care about what's economically efficient for the content they care about.  As long as you can provide in-demand content to people in a competitive and accessible way that they can economically rationalize, it doesn't matter whether your tech is old or new.  OTT is a red herring.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
7/31/2016 9:10:53 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: No suprise
@faryl: I complained on Twitter about a recent issue (long story short: their Amazon Prime driver evidently lied about making any attempt to deliver package because I was home and available, waiting, the whole time; didn't even get so much as a phone call; had to have a lengthy call with idiotic/unhelpful customer service; when the guy came for redelivery the next day, he yelled and was rude, apparently annoyed I had called him out on his nonsense).  Twitter customer response team told me to go to some website and fill out a form.  All this over a $25 order.  Forget it.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
7/31/2016 9:06:38 PM
User Rank
Author
Re: No suprise
@elizabethv: Sure.  Your points are all sound.  My only point is just because it's an industry where there's money to be made doesn't mean Comcast has to jump into the pool too, necessarily.

Besides, for the CAPEX to get into that business?  They're money is better spent on other things.  In particular: Content.

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